When It Comes To Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer, More Awareness Is Needed

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in a Cure article about the lack of awareness among providers and patients of early-onset colorectal cancer.

Early-onset colorectal cancer affects those younger than 50 years of age. While many don’t think about getting screened for colon cancer until the age of 50, the rates of colorectal cancer in young and middle-aged adults have increased and are predicted to continue to increase. This is due to many factors, including unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, one’s family history and a lack of awareness.

While colorectal cancer is known as a silent and even painless killer, symptoms can include:

  • Blood present in the stool
  • Change in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or consistency)
  • Loss of weight
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fatigue

If you have a family history of cancer or polyps, it is urged that you speak to a health care professional about getting screened early. Lifestyle factors that can lead to colorectal cancer include obesity, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise, as well as a diet high in red processed meat and low in fresh fruits or vegetables.

According to Dr. Jones, those with a higher sense of awareness tend to be diagnosed at an earlier stage when the cancer is more treatable. Conversely, studies have shown that those with stage 3 and 4 colorectal cancers are among patients that experienced a prolonged diagnostic delay. Therefore, it is recommended that one seek medical help for symptoms right away. While one often delays speaking to a doctor due to embarrassment, this time period is even more prolonged when one factors in the time gap of seeing a primary care physician and then a specialist. “Unless you are aware, you can’t link that to an action, such as being screened, preventing early, behavioral changes,” Jones explained.

Read the full article here:

Crohn’s & Colitis Take Steps Walk

Join us Saturday, June 1st at the Louisville Slugger Field for the Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk!

Registration starts at 10am and the take steps walk will begin at 11am. This event is put on by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, an organization whose mission it is to provide support and resources for those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

The nationwide walk will help fund patient services, education, advocacy and research. Through better treatment methods and cures, we can ultimately improve the quality of life for those affected by IBD.

What is Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

IBD is a term used to describe disorders involving chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are two of the most common types of IBD. Crohn’s Disease affects the lining of the entire digestive tract. However, Ulcerative Colitis specifically inflames only the lining of the colon and rectum.

While the causes for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are currently unknown, combined they affect nearly 3.1 million Americans. Patients tend to be diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35. The fast growing segment of patients are children under the age of 18. 

How to Get Involved:

The Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk is a great opportunity for patients, families, healthcare providers and organizations to come together as a community and offer lasting support to one another. For those interested in registering as a walker, donating, volunteering or creating a team of walkers, visit crohnscolitisfoundation.org for more information. Each team and individual is able to set their own fundraising goal. The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s goal for this event is $65,000.

The Gastroenterology Health Partners proudly sponsors this event. To schedule an appointment and get screened, contact us today! Additionally, the GHP clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system.  If you believe you may be a candidate for one of our studies, please contact our Research Manager, Deborah Walker via email at dwalker@ghpartners.net or by phone at 812-206-1702.

take steps walk

Dr. John Horlander Explains a Colonoscopy

A Gastro Health Partner physician, Dr. John Horlander is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He has authored various articles relating to gastroenterology and has been involved in research pertaining to the study of gastroenterology.

In this episode of WHAS’s Great Day Live, Dr. Horlander sits down with Rachel Platt and Terry Meiners to explain the ins and outs of a colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer both in Kentucky and the United States.  A colonoscopy can help screen for both colorectal and colon cancer by detecting and removing polyps. Polyps are abnormal growths within the colon lining. While it can take years for polyps to become cancerous, having them preemptively removed is a good preventative measure.

A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure that requires a cleansing routine the day prior to the procedure. This cleansing routine in the most important part of the procedure. A colonoscopy usually only takes 20 to 30 minutes from start to finish and no discomfort is felt as patients are sedated. To schedule a colonoscopy, contact the Gastro Health Partners location nearest you today. 

Watch the full episode of Dr. John Horlander on WHAS Great Day Live here: 

Dr. John Horlander received his undergraduate degree at the University of Notre Dame and earned his Medical degree at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed his clinical training at Indiana University Medical Center where he completed an Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine followed by a dual Fellowship in Gastroenterology & Hepatology.