Getting Ready For A Colonoscopy Prep When You Tend To Be Constipated

Preparing for your colonoscopy is important because it enables your physician to visibly access all areas of your colon to provide the best screening possible. A successful prep – one where your colon is thoroughly cleansed in advanced – makes it easier for your gastroenterologist to do their job thoroughly and accurately. When patients do not have a successful colonoscopy preparation, and stool is still visible in the colon, it makes it much harder for your doctor to do a thorough evaluation.

If you’re a person that tends to struggle regularly with constipation, the colonoscopy prep may be a bigger concern. You may wonder if the prep will actually work and feel an added worry about how this relates to the actual procedure. Fortunately, there are some additional things you can do a week or so in advance to make the entire process easier and more successful.

People who are often constipated frequently have a longer, tortuous colon which may be more challenging to completely empty out. In these cases, your doctor may provide some additional guidance regarding your prep.  Follow along for some helpful suggestions for preparing for your colonoscopy if you tend to be constipated.

8 Things To Know If You Are Preparing For A Colonoscopy And Are Often Constipated

1. You should tell your doctor in advance that you struggle with constipation. People who tend to be constipated may have to think about their colonoscopy prep further in advance than those who are not. Make sure to let your doctor know in advance if constipation is something that you struggle with frequently. Depending on your symptoms and medical history, your doctor may advise additional things like Dulcolax to help make sure your colonoscopy prep is a success.

2. Ask your doctor about medications, vitamins and supplements you normally take. You may be advised to adjust your normal routine in some way depending on your situation.

3. Cut out high fiber foods several days before your procedure. This includes things like raw fruits and vegetables, canned and fresh corn, whole grains like oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, popcorn, and wheat bread, all kinds of nuts, and seeds (including sunflower, sesame, and poppy). Focus instead of non-fibrous foods like soups (without vegetables), eggs, yogurt, white bread and puddings.

4. Your doctor may advise you to begin the clear liquid diet for your prep a day early (two days in advance). This involves avoiding solid foods and consuming clear liquids that are NOT red, blue, or purple in color. This includes things like gelatin, clear broth, sports drinks with electrolytes, black coffee, fruit juice like apple or white grape, and popsicles.

5. It can be helpful to drink lots of extra water the week leading up to your procedure to make sure you are very well hydrated. Not only is hydration a key part of addressing constipation, but it also may help to make your overall prep experience easier. Keep in mind that if you tend to drink caffeinated beverages like coffee and tea, these tend to have a dehydrating effect on your body, and you may need to compensate with additional water.

6. Make the time to deal with your worry and stress. Sometimes constipation is exacerbated by stress. It is important that you recognize and deal with this if possible. Find ways to help yourself relax. Consider trying mindfulness, meditation and/or breathing exercises, listen to relaxing music, and engage in other healthy practices that help you feel calmer and more relaxed.

7. Prioritize a healthy routine including getting enough sleep leading up to the procedure. While it is always important to focus on a healthy routine, including getting enough sleep each night, it may become even more important the week leading up to your colonoscopy. This can help you feel your best for the procedure, enabling you to follow the prep with greater ease, also reducing your level of stress and worry.

8. Don’t be embarrassed, constipation is something many people experience. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney diseases, constipation is common among people of every age and population in the U.S. Approximately 16% of adults experience symptoms of constipation on a regular basis, with this number increasing with age, to a third of adults 60 years and older.

Data reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that upwards of one in three adults ages 45 to 75 has not had a colonoscopy, the recommended screening for colorectal cancer. While there are many reasons why people may opt to avoid this recommended procedure, concerns about what is required to prepare for the exam certainly play a role for some.

The experienced team of medical professionals at Gastroenterology Health Partners is committed to making every patient’s experience with a colonoscopy as low stress and easy as possible. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Gastroenterology Health Partners today at a location near you.

Importance of Colon Screening in Younger Adults – Dr. Sohi Interviewed

Dr. Sunana Sohi of Gastroenterology Health Partners was recently featured in a WHAS-11 article and video about the increasing rates of colon cancer in younger adults.

The story featured Amanda Blackburn, a 37 year-old mother of two who was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer in 2017. She received a diagnosis after coming to Dr. Sohi with her symptoms of rectal bleeding and a change in bowel habits.

Blackburn had no family history of colon cancer and knew very little about the disease, like many younger adults. “It wasn’t on my radar. The ‘C’ word wasn’t a thing for me,” she said.

Dr. Sohi was able to help Blackburn receive diagnosis and treatment.

“If you have symptoms, don’t wait. There are a lot of tests that can be done, including stool tests, but the number one, the gold standard is colonoscopy. That’s because it’s not only diagnostic but preventative, where we can find and remove small polyps before they become cancer,” Dr. Sohi said.

Read the rest of the Dr. Sohi’s write-up here.

Colon Cancer is not a disease of the elderly anymore; article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The article also discussed the upcoming Kicking Butt 5K Run/Walk, scheduled for Saturday September 25th at the Louisville Waterfront Park. This event, sponsored by the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, was started in 2003 as a way to bring together cancer survivors and advocates, spread awareness, and encourage screenings. It’s not too late to sign up for the 5K, 1 mile, or virtual event, and support this worthy cause.

If you or a loved one are experiencing symptoms of colon cancer or another GI condition, don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Sohi or one of the many experienced physicians at Gastroenterology Health Partners.

As the largest independent gastroenterology practice in the region, GHP is considered the only one of its kind providing results-orientated treatment for a full spectrum of digestive system disorders. Call to set up an appointment at one of our locations in Southern Indiana, Northeast & Central Louisville, and Lexington.

Why You Shouldn’t Wait To Get A Colorectal Cancer Screening

Are you on the fence about getting screened for colorectal cancer? Perhaps you think you’re too young to get cancer, or you don’t have a family history of it, or you’re anxious about the procedure. You push off the appointment, allowing yourself to think, “I’ll do it sometime soon…”

When it comes to colorectal cancer screenings, you shouldn’t ever wait. Regular screenings are recommended for those 45 years and older, and even younger if you have certain risk factors. For example, people with certain inherited conditions are at a higher risk for colon cancer, including those with Lynch syndrome and those with adenomatous polyopsis. You are also at higher risk if you suffer from certain inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s colitis, or ulcerative colitis.

Early detection is the key to effectively dealing with colorectal cancer. When detected early, colorectal cancer has a 95% survival rate. However, that rate drops to 25% if the cancer is not detected and spreads to other organs. 

Screening tests aren’t just used to identify existing cancer. Through screening, your doctor may find and eliminate precancerous polyps (abnormal tissue growths) in the rectum or colon, removing them before they even have the chance of becoming cancerous. Between 25-40% of adults in the United States are estimated to have colorectal polyps.

Colorectal Cancer Increases in Younger Populations 

While the overall occurrence of colorectal cancer has dropped in recent years (largely due to a rise in screenings), its rate among younger populations has actually increased. In fact, according to the American College of Gastroenterology, a millennial now has 2 times the risk of getting colon cancer and 4 times the risk of getting rectal cancer than someone from the baby boom generation. Research shows that rates in adults younger than 50 are continually increasing by 2%, every year. Mortality rates are also increasing.

What is causing this alarming change? Researchers attribute higher colorectal cancer rates in younger adults to a number of factors, including higher rates of obesity, more sedentary lifestyles, poor diet, and other environmental factors. A study released this May found a link between the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and colorectal cancer in women under 50. According to the study, women who drank two or more servings of sugary beverages had twice the risk of developing early-onset colorectal than those who consumed less. Furthermore, adolescents ages 13-18 who consumed sugary sodas had a 32% risk of eventually developing early-onset colorectal cancer. Research is only beginning to unlock certain lifestyle and dietary factors that play a role in developing colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Cancer and Covid-19

During the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, lockdowns and closings forced many people to cancel or put off every type of screening test. Colorectal screening tests in particular decreased by over 90%. In the following months, the numbers of tests only increased to 50% of what they were before the pandemic began. This drastic decline in testing is associated with troubling data about cancer outcomes. In June 2020, the National Cancer Institute predicted an excess of 10,000 colorectal cancer or breast cancer related deaths in the U.S. over the next 10 years, just because of pandemic-induced delays in testing, diagnoses, and treatments. Remaining up-to-date on testing is more important now than ever. 

If you’re due for a colorectal screening test or appointment, but are concerned about Covid-19 safety, don’t hesitate to book an appointment at Gastroenterology Health Partners. We uphold a number of safety procedures in-office, including mask requirements, cleaning and sanitization practices, disinfecting common spaces, and upholding social distancing when possible. Maintaining your safety is of the highest importance to us, just as is providing you with colorectal screening tests such as colonoscopies, flexible sigmoidoscopies, and more. Give us a call today to schedule your appointment.

ValueOfColonoscopy.org: ASGE’s Useful Awareness and Screening Tool

There are a lot of great resources if you are interested in learning more about colon cancer and screenings. One of our favorites comes from the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscoy (ASGE). The ASGE has a plethora of resources including videos, a screening tool, and statistics at ValueOfColonoscopy.org. Today on the blog, we’ll take you through some of the useful resources on the website.

Screening Tool: Determining Which Test You Should Get

One question many people have about screenings is which test to get. There are numerous options available. It can be confusing when figuring out which is the best fit. Fortunately, the ASGE created a tool that helps you identify the screening method that’s right for you. In a simple yet informative document, they take you through your options based on your risk level (no personal or family history of colon polyps or cancer, family history, or personal history). This tool shows you how these factors impact when you should be screened, how often, and with which screening method. For example, if you have a family history of colon cancer or polyps, it shows that you should have a screening as early as age 40. It also shows that a colonoscopy is best screening given your family history. It recommends talking with your doctor to establish a plan.

Colonoscopies during the Pandemic

During the pandemic, many people have had valid concerns about the safety of activities like doctor’s visits. This has actually impacted how many colonoscopies doctors have performed, and as a result an increase in the number of missed colorectal cancer diagnoses (read our blog post here to learn more). In a video, the ASGE shows how many steps medical professionals are taking to ensure your safety during screenings. They talk about pre-arrival screenings, in-office distancing and barriers, masking, PPE, testing, staff vaccinations, and more. We highly recommend watching this video to get a clear picture of how safe your screening will be. Plus, read our blog post here about what we have been doing at GHP to keep you safe.

Tips as you Prepare for a Colonoscopy

Another important thing this website covers is common patient FAQs leading up to a colonoscopy. The ASGE has a number of helpful guides and tips for you as you prepare for a screening. For example, they have a webpage dedicated to understanding bowel prep, an aspect of screening that many patients dread. They discuss the importance of bowel prep, what type of prep you may need to pursue, and other helpful tips. They even discuss common side effects, specific steps in prepping, and what to do if you forget to take prep medication. This is a great resource to help you make sure your screening is as effective as possible. The ASGE also has content and FAQs that help you understand colon polyps and colonoscopies.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

How has the Pandemic Affected Colonoscopies?

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted our lives in countless ways. From finances to health and other aspects of life, it has changed how we live each day. In particular, many common medical check-ups, screenings, and elective procedures have been put on hold or delayed. One of these, the colonoscopy, has seen significantly decreased rates during the pandemic. This is a serious issue, as we know colonoscopies are a key screening strategy to prevent colorectal cancer. On today’s blog, we’ll take a look at how the pandemic has affected colonoscopies.

Colonoscopies During the Pandemic

Early on in the pandemic in 2020, medical practices put many elective and non-essential medical visits and procedures on hold. As a result, screenings for cancer like colonoscopies dropped significantly. One study examining screening rates in the San Francisco area found that colonoscopies decreased about 90% from February to May 2020. This coincided with an 85% decrease in fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), another screening method in the same time frame. There was also a 70% decrease in all in-person appointments, and a 60% increase in telehealth visits. Another report estimated that if that trend continued through early June 2020, there could be around 19,000 missed colorectal cancer diagnoses and over 4,000 additional colorectal cancer deaths across the United States.

These are significant impacts, and compound existing inequities in health outcomes. Many groups that have an increased risk of colorectal cancer have also experienced a higher risk of death from the coronavirus. These groups include Black, Native American, and Hispanic people.

Clearly, the pandemic has caused cascading public health problems. Fortunately, as we have learned more about the coronavirus, medical practices have been able to respond to transmission threats to practice safely. Masking, social distancing, sanitizing, and now vaccinations for medical staff have helped to create safe spaces for patients to receive medical care.

Importance of Screening for Colorectal Cancer

Screening for colorectal cancer is extremely important. When properly done, it has a high success rate at cancer prevention. With a colonoscopy, doctors can identify and remove precancerous polyps that could otherwise develop into cancer over time. The colonoscopy is the gold standard for screenings. When patients get colonoscopies on a proper schedule, the incidence of colorectal cancer falls by around 90%.

Gastro Health Partners, in line with various other organizations, is now endorsing regular screenings starting at age 45. Previously, 50 was the standard for beginning screenings. By changing this to 45, we can prevent more potential cases of cancer and save lives. If you are close to 45 or older, talk with your doctor about getting screened. They will take your situation into account and may recommend earlier or more frequent screenings depending on factors like family history and personal history of polyps.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Colorectal Cancer and Age, Race, and Ethnicity

Colorectal cancer is not experienced equally by everyone. In the past several years, younger people have experienced increased colorectal cancer rates and deaths. Additionally, Black people and American Indians experience more cases of this cancer and related deaths. Here’s what you need to know about how this disease affects different people.

Colorectal Cancer in Younger Adults

Rates of colorectal cancer have been on the rise for younger and younger adults over the last several years. According to the American Cancer Society, while rates for adults 50 and older have fallen due to increased screenings, the opposite trend has occurred for younger adults. Recently, people 65 and older have experienced a decrease of around 3% per year from 2011 to 2016. In contrast, people ages 50 to 64 have seen rates rise by 1% per year in the same time frame. People under 50 have actually seen rates rise by 2.2% per year in the same window. Clearly, younger adults are seeing steeper increases in cases. Death rates have followed similar patterns. Death rates for colorectal cancer also vary by age group. Between 2008 and 2017, death rates fell by 3% per year in people 65 and older and dropped by 0.6% in people 50 to 64. However, they rose by 1.3% in people younger than 50.

Fortunately, colorectal cancer can be very treatable if it’s caught early. Younger adults should be aware of warning signs. These include changes in bowel movements (particularly over two weeks or more), rectal bleeding, unusual stools, and tiredness or low energy. If they have any of these symptoms, they should see their doctor.

Disparities Based on Race and Ethnicity

Along with age, looking at colorectal cancer rates and death rates based on race and ethnicity shows significant variation. The American Cancer Society’s data from 2012-2016 showed that rates were dramatically different based on race. Rates for Asian people and Pacific Islanders were the lowest at 30 per 100,000. Non-Hispanic white people had a rate of 39 per 100,000, and Black people had a rate of 46 per 100,000. Alaska Natives and American Indians had the highest rate, at 89 per 100,000. Death rates vary significantly as well- colorectal cancer rates are around 20% higher for Black people than non-Hispanic white people, but death rates are nearly 40% higher in Black people. Additionally, for Alaska Natives and American Indians, death rates are about double the rate for Black people.

Early Screenings Save Lives

While many of these statistics are troubling, we do know that screening early is an effective way to catch more cases of colorectal cancer. More and more organizations, including Gastro Health Partners, are pushing for earlier screenings and research on the disparities around this disease. Early screenings save lives.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for and treating colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Lynch Syndrome: An Overview

Lynch syndrome is an inherited genetic condition that increases risk for colorectal and other cancers. It is the single most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Here’s what you need to know about the condition.

What causes Lynch Syndrome?

Lynch syndrome, sometimes called hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, is inherited by children from their parents. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that only a single copy of the altered gene needs to be present. So, if someone inherits a mutation in a gene related to the syndrome, they will still have a normal copy. However, cancer occurs when a second mutation affects the normal copy of the gene.

The specific genes involved in the syndrome are all involved in repairing errors that occur during DNA replication. If any of the genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) have a mutation, errors occurring in replication accumulate, which can end up leading to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer.

Complications from Lynch Syndrome

If you have Lynch syndrome, you have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer, and developing it at a younger age. People with the syndrome also have a higher risk of developing kidney, stomach, brain, liver, uterine, and some skin cancers. There are several other inherited conditions that can increase your risk of colon cancer, but this syndrome is the single most common. A rough estimate is that around 3% of all colorectal and endometrial cancers are caused by the syndrome. Around 1 in 279 people in the United States have Lynch syndrome.

In addition, having Lynch syndrome has impacts on the rest of your family. First, a positive diagnosis means that your blood relatives may have a chance of having the syndrome. In addition, any children you may have are at a higher risk of having it. If one parent has a genetic mutation related to the syndrome, a child has a 50% chance of inheriting it. This is because the syndrome is autosomal dominant, as discussed previously. You may want to meet with a genetic counselor to talk through these implications if you have a Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

The Importance of Family History

Since you inherit Lynch syndrome, knowing your family history related to colorectal cancers is crucial. If your family has a history of colorectal or endometrial cancer, you should talk with your doctor to evaluate your risk. In particular, you are more likely to have the syndrome if your family has a history of colorectal cancer at a young age, endometrial cancer, or other related cancers.

Your doctor may recommend a genetic evaluation of your family history and risk. Genetic counselors can help you understand Lynch syndrome and whether genetic testing is a good option for you. Usually, family members with the syndrome share the same specific genetic mutation. If any of your family members have a known a syndrome mutation, you may be tested for the same mutation if you are pursuing genetic testing.

The good news is that we can prevent a lot of the cancers caused by Lynch syndrome with early screenings. Screening early and often can help catch cancer early and lead to better outcomes.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for and treating cancers caused by Lynch syndrome. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Colorectal Cancer Screening at 45

Colorectal cancer screening is a crucial step to identify cancer early and save lives. Previous medical guidance has dictated that screenings should start at age 50 in most cases. However, the American Cancer Society now endorses screenings starting at age 45. Gastro Health Partners endorses this approach as well. Here’s an overview of why screening is so important, and what your options are.

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer, sometimes called colon cancer, is cancer that occurs in the rectum or colon. Abnormal growths called polyps can grow in the colon or rectum and become cancerous. When this happens, cancers grow into the wall of the colon or rectum over time. They then have the potential to spread into lymph vessels or blood vessels and travel to other parts of the body.

Screening is important because it can prevent the development of colorectal cancer and more widespread cancer in the body. If caught early, colorectal cancer is often very treatable. For example, during a screening, precancerous polyps in the colon or rectum can be removed before they become cancerous. Screening is a life-saving preventative measure: in this case, there is a 90% survival rate when cancer is found and treated early on. It is also helpful because many people will not exhibit symptoms until their colorectal cancer has progressed significantly. Getting screened can help doctors catch and treat cancer before it develops or spreads significantly.

Who Should be Screened and When?

Screening is the key prevention strategy for all adults. Everyone should get a screening regularly at a certain point. As mentioned before, the previous guidance was most people should be screened starting at age 50. Now, guidance has shifted to starting at age 45.

Additionally, other factors can influence when and how often you should be screened. If your family has a history of colon cancer, if you have had polyps, or if you have an inflammatory bowel disease or some genetic disorders, you may need to be screened earlier and/or more often.

Types of Screening and How Often to Get Screened

There are a few main screening options. You should talk with your doctor to determine the best path for you. As alluded to, the colonoscopy is the gold standard for screenings. During a colonoscopy, your doctor is able to look at your entire colon and can remove polyps. You may only need a colonoscopy once every 10 years if you have a negative screening. Another screening option is a Flexible Sigmoidoscopy, which is performed every 5 years with negative screenings. The downside of this method is that it doesn’t give a full view of the colon like a colonoscopy does. Only the lower parts of the colon are viewable with this test.

There are also a few stool-based screenings available. With stool tests, you collect a stool sample at home and send it in to your doctor for analysis. This method does not identify abnormalities as effectively as a colonoscopy. Doctors may also pursue follow-up testing if they confirm a positive result. There are a few other screening options that may be available as well, like a Capsule Endoscopy or a CT Colonography. Your doctor will recommend the best option based on your specific case.

Getting screened for colorectal cancer is an extremely effective way to prevent cancer. Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience performing screenings. We can help establish the best plan of diagnosis and care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Actor Will Smith and His Colonoscopy

Actor Will Smith recently posted a vlog on his YouTube channel documenting the process of getting a colonoscopy. His video is a great up-close look at the process and why it is so important for everyone.

The Colonoscopy Video

Will uploaded the video on YouTube on November 6, 2019. Will Smith turned 50 in 2019 and his doctor advised him to get screened for colorectal cancer. The video starts with him asking his doctor about the logistics of the procedure. He also documents the effects of the colonoscopy prep, and shows footage of him entering the exam room on the day of the procedure. We also see Will after the procedure under lingering effects of anaesthetic. The video ends with Will’s doctor talking through the exam results with him.

During the procedure, doctors actually found a polyp and removed it. Polyps are pre-cancerous lesions that are common in the colon. They removed the polyp and sent it to biopsy, where it was determined to be a tubular adenoma, a benign type of polyp that has the potential to become cancerous.

Will’s doctor speaks about her gratefulness that he was a compliant patient who took her recommendation for screening. She explains that the type and location of polyp Will had could have made it virtually unnoticeable if he hadn’t gotten screened; it is likely that by the time he started to show symptoms, it would have spread to other parts of his body. The video ends with his doctor talking through all of this and recommending a follow-up screening in the next two or three years, since he had a polyp. You can watch the video here.

A History of Celebrities Raising Awareness of Screenings

Will isn’t the first celebrity to publicize their own experience with a screening. Back in 2000, Katie Couric got a colonoscopy on the Today show to raise awareness on the importance of colon cancer screenings. Her husband had died of colon cancer in 1998. She went on to co-found the National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance. In 2018, Couric also accompanied TV host Jimmy Kimmel through the colonoscopy process on his show.

The impact of celebrity promotion of screenings may be significant. In the year following Katie Couric’s Today show colonoscopy, there was a significant increase in screenings in the United States. A study from 2003 found that colonoscopy utilization rates increased in two large data sets following Katie’s promotion.  The first data set found an increase in the number of colonoscopies performed per month from 15 to 18.01. Additionally, analysis of the second data set, which was comprised of adults in a managed care organization, found that colonoscopies increased from 1.3 per 1000 people per month to 1.8 per 1000. This finding of increased screenings is called the Katie Couric Effect.

The Importance of Destigmatizing Colonoscopies

This video is important in a lot of ways. Having a celebrity share their experience with colon cancer screening can impact a lot of people and save many lives. As of the writing of this blog post, over 3.2 million people have watched the video.

Many people are uncomfortable with the idea of a colonoscopy, and avoid screenings for far too long. In particular, the idea of having an endoscope enter your body through your anus and the bowel prep associated with the procedure are barriers for some people. This is a problem, because screenings are extremely effective: colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and the survival rate for early detection of colon cancer is around 92%. Clearly, screenings save lives.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience performing colorectal cancer screenings. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Colonoscopy: What to Expect

A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows a physician to examine a patient’s colon. Colonoscopies are often used to evaluate GI disorders and screen for colon cancer. Here’s what you need to know if you are preparing for a colonoscopy.  

When it’s used

There are a few reasons your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy. The procedure is commonly used as a screening tool for colon cancer, which starts from polyps in the colon. A colonoscopy can help your doctor examine your colon for any polyps and other warning signs of colon cancer. You may also need a colonoscopy if you have previously had polyps. In this case, your doctor will likely look for more polyps and remove any, as a preventative measure against colon cancer. Last, you may need a colonoscopy if you have any GI pain or distress that your doctor needs to identify and diagnose through examination. 

Preparing for a Colonoscopy

There are a few important pre-procedure steps you need to take leading up to a colonoscopy. You will be asked to adhere to a cleansing routine the day before the procedure. This typically consists of taking a liquid laxative the day before to empty your bowels, and switching to a clear liquid diet. You may be asked to drink plenty of liquids as well. Following the instructions on laxative use is a crucial step to properly prepare for the exam, so always be diligent in this regard. 

In addition to the cleansing routine, you should also discuss any medications you use with your doctor. You may have to stop use of some medications like blood-thinners prior to the procedure. This is because some of these medications can increase the risk of excessive bleeding. If you use insulin, you may need to adjust dosage and timing the day of the procedure. Your doctor will also want to know about any allergies to medication you have. 

What to Expect During the Procedure

A colonoscopy takes about 20-30 minutes in total. You will be sedated for the entire procedure, so there is no discomfort during it. Your doctor will monitor your heart rate, blood oxygen levels, and blood pressure throughout the process as well. During the procedure, your doctor will insert a colonoscope (a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera) in your anus while you lay on your side and advance it to the end of your colon. The camera and light allow your doctor to fully examine the colon lining. 

If your doctor sees anything they want to analyze further, they may take a small tissue sample (biopsy) for later analysis. In the case that they see any bleeding during the examination, they can feed instruments through the colonoscope to medicate, cauterize, or clip affected areas and control bleeding. If they find any polyps, they can use an instrument threaded through the colonoscope to remove them. None of these techniques cause discomfort during the procedure. 

After the Procedure

It typically takes around an hour to mostly recover from the sedation after a colonoscopy. As such, you should always have someone take you home afterwards. The effects can linger to an extent for the next 24 hours, so you should avoid driving, making important decisions, or working for that period of time as well. If any polyps were removed during the procedure, you may be prescribed a temporary special diet. It’s common to pass gas and feel bloated for a few hours after the exam. Walking can help ease some of this discomfort. 

You may see a small amount of blood in your stool during your first bowel movement post-procedure; this is not cause for alarm most of the time. However, if bleeding persists or you develop a fever or consistent bowel pain within a week or two of the procedure, you should contact your doctor. 

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience performing colonoscopies. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.