Gastroenterology Health Partners Louisville Announces Move To New Watterson Towers Location at 1941 Bishop Lane in October 2022

(PRLEAP.COM) Gastroenterology Health Partners, powered by One GI, has opened its doors to expansion. Once located in a suite within the medical arts building on Eastern Parkway in Louisville, GHP has decided to relocate its Central Louisville base of operations where, beginning Monday, October 10th, 2022, patients will be able to enjoy a spacious expansion on the 2nd floor of Watterson Towers, 1941 Bishop Lane, Louisville, KY 40218, located directly off the Watterson Expressway at Newburg Road.

Learn more about what the new location has to offer in the press release!

You’re always welcome at every at Gastro Health Partners location, each who have specialists on staff for your gastroenterological needs. Visit our Patient Portal to get started on your journey to a healthier you! You can also call your nearest GHP clinic location below:

SOUTHERN INDIANA
2630 Grant Line Road
New Albany, IN 47150
812-945-0145

CENTRAL LOUISVILLE
NEW IN OCTOBER 2022: 1941 Bishop Lane Suite 200
Louisville, KY 40218
502-452-9567

LEXINGTON
3225 Summit Square Place, Suite 100
Lexington, KY 40509
859-266-7999

NORTHEAST LOUISVILLE
2401 Terra Crossing Boulevard, Suite 410
Louisville, KY 40245
502-888-1988

120 Gastroenterologists to Know in 2022

If you’re on the search for a Gastroenterologist near you, you’re in luck – in an article written by Claire Wallace of Becker’s Healthcare, you can find an extensive list of Gastroenterologists across the country available with services available for your use.

In her article, Ms. Wallace describes Gastroenterology as, “A broad field covering a wide range of patient care, from endoscopy and colonoscopy to hepatitis C and pancreatic cancer.” Following her definition, she goes on to list 120 GIs to know, which we believe is extraordinarily helpful to people searching for the right Gastroenterologist for the first time, or as they move.

Here’s her list of 120 GIs to know in 2022:

Tyler Aasen, DO. The Iowa Clinic (West Des Moines). Dr. Aasen has been with The Iowa Clinic since 2020. He has a clinical interest in chronic liver disease and celiac disease.

Abera Abay, MD. William W. Backus Hospital (Norwich, Conn.). Dr. Abay serves as chair of quality assurance and performance improvement of Eastern Connecticut Endoscopy Center. He is also chair of the Medical Ethics Committee of the New London County Medical Association.

Gebran Abboud, MD. University of Arizona College of Medicine (Tucson). Dr. Abboud’s specialty is treating diseases of the pancreas, biliary system, liver, esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. Before his current role as clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, he was the director of gastroenterology at the Conemaugh Health System in Johnstown, Pa.

Maisa Abdalla, MD. Loma Linda (Calif.) University Medical Center. Dr. Abdalla has served as an assistant professor of medicine at Loma Linda University Medical Center since 2016. She practices there and at Riverside University Health System in Moreno Valley, Calif. She aims to improve accessibility and quality in patient care.

Tsion Abdi, MD. Johns Hopkins Medicine (Baltimore). Dr. Abdi serves as a clinical director for Johns Hopkins Knoll North Gastroenterology and Hepatology in Columbia, Md., and as an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Medical Association.

Faten Aberra, MD. Penn Medicine (Philadelphia). Dr. Aberra is the director of Epic for the gastroenterology division. She is also an associate professor of medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Neena Abraham, MD. Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minn.). Dr. Abraham is also director of the Institute for Research and Education for the American College of Gastroenterology. She was most recently named the 2021 Healio & American College of Gastroenterology disruptive innovator in clinical medicine.

Maria Abreu, MD. University of Miami Health System. Dr. Abreu’s areas of expertise include inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. She is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in gastroenterology and internal medicine.

Abimbola Adike, MD. Digestive Disease and Endoscopy Center (Silverdale, Wash.). Dr. Adike is a member of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the American College of Gastroenterology. Her special interests are liver and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Adewale Ajumobi, MD. Eisenhower Health (Rancho Mirage, Calif.). Dr. Ajumobi is the founder and editor of BowelPrepGuide, which was recognized by the American College of Gastroenterology as the best website for colorectal cancer outreach, prevention and year-round excellence in 2015. He has been the recipient of the American College of Gastroenterology Service Award for Colorectal Cancer Outreach, Prevention & Year-Round Excellence multiple times.

Andrew Albert, MD. Chicago Gastro. Dr. Albert is a clinical assistant professor of medicine in the digestive diseases and nutrition department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also has advanced training in inflammatory bowel disease.

Tauseef Ali, MD. SSM Health St. Anthony Hospital (Oklahoma City). Dr. Ali is chief of gastroenterology medical staff section at SSM Health St. Anthony Hospital as well as an assistant clinical professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. His specialty is inflammatory bowel disease, but he also has clinical interests in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, colorectal screening, hemorrhoid banding and general gastroenterology.

Christopher Almario, MD. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles). Dr. Almario is also an assistant professor of medicine at Cedars-Sinai. He is a recipient of the American College of Gastroenterology Junior Faculty Development Grant.

Mohammad Alsolaiman, MD. Revere Health (American Fork and Lehi, Utah). Dr. Alsolaiman has advanced endoscopy training in pancreatic and biliary diseases. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastroenterology Endoscopy.

Johnny Altawil, MD. The Endoscopy Center (Knoxville, Tenn.). Dr. Altawil is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the American Gastroenterological Association. He is also board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

Oksana Anand, MD. Rapid City (S.D.) Medical Center. Dr. Anand has a variety of special interests, including women’s GI health and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been a member of the American College of Gastroenterology since 2008.

Rajeswari Anaparthy, MD. Southwest Gastroenterology (Avondale, Ariz.). Dr. Anaparthy is the director and co-founder of Southwest Gastroenterology. She has been practicing gastroenterology since 2013 and is a diplomat for the American Board of Gastroenterology.

Julian Armstrong, MD. Texas Digestive Disease Consultants (Fort Worth). Dr. Armstrong believes gastroenterology is the perfect mixture of medicine and surgery. Before his current role at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, he was the chief of gastroenterology at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center in Germany.

Mukul Arya, MD. White Plains (N.Y.) Hospital. Dr. Arya was recently appointed director of advanced gastroenterology at White Plains Hospital. He previously served at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital in New York City as director of advanced endoscopy.

Carl Atallah, DO. Advanced GI (Chicago). Dr. Atallah served as a clinical assistant professor at Midwestern University in Chicago during his gastroenterology fellowship. He is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the American Osteopathic Association.

Joseph Baltz Jr., MD. Gastro One (Germantown, Tenn.). Dr. Baltz has advanced training in endoscopic ultrasound, ablation of Barrett’s esophagus and endoscopic mucosal resection. He is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Arthur Baluyut, MD, PhD. Northside Gastro (Indianapolis). Dr. Baluyut has 20 years of experience in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. In addition to clinical gastroenterology research, he researches the basic science of immunology.

Kevin Batte, MD. Gastroenterology Associates and Endoscopy Center of North Mississippi (Oxford). Dr. Batte has given several poster presentations on gastroenterology and has a manuscript on achalasia published in BMC Gastroenterology. He is a member of organizations including the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the South Carolina Medical Association.

Michelle Beilstein, MD. The Oregon Clinic (Portland). Dr. Beilstein joined The Oregon Clinic in 2004. She has special interest in gastrointestinal oncology with a focus on pancreatic, biliary and esophageal cancer.

Emanuelle Bellaguarda, MD. Northwestern Memorial Hospital (Chicago). Dr. Bellaguarda is an assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She is an advisory board member for several companies, including Pfizer, Prometheus Laboratories and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation.

Louis Bell, MD. Coastal Gastroenterology (Bluffton, S.C.). Dr. Bell has 29 years of gastroenterology experience. He performs about 1,500 procedures annually and has performed over 25,000 colonoscopies during his career.

Sameer Berry, MD. Oshi Health (New York). Dr. Berry is the CMO of Oshi Health, a virtual-first gastrointestinal care clinic. In addition to his position at Oshi Health, he is a gastroenterology fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Ruchi Bhatia, MD. Ohio Gastroenterology Group (Columbus). Dr. Bhatia has been with Ohio Gastroenterology Group since September 2018. She has a special interest in the diagnosis and management of liver diseases and liver transplantation.

Marc Bissonnette, MD. University of Chicago Medical Center. Dr. Bissonnette is also an associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He is working to develop a blood test for colorectal cancer and plans to use it on Chicago’s South Side to reduce healthcare disparities.

Jennifer Brenner, MD. Colorado Gastroenterology (Denver). Dr. Brenner specializes in gastrointestinal health and liver diseases affecting women. She is an active member of the American Gastroenterology Association and the American College of Gastroenterology.

Michael Butensky, MD. Connecticut Gastroenterology Associates (Hartford). Dr. Butensky is the president and managing partner of Connecticut Gastroenterology Associates. He has interests in pancreaticobiliary disease, colon cancer screening and the management of inflammatory bowel disease. He has published various articles in peer-reviewed journals.

John Carethers, MD. Michigan Medicine (Ann Arbor). Dr. Carethers began his tenure as the president of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute in June. He also serves as the John G. Searle Professor of Internal Medicine and chair of the department of internal medicine at Michigan Medicine.

Sara Chalifoux, MD. United Gastroenterologists (Murrieta, Calif.). Dr. Chalifoux has an interest in the application of integrative health approaches toward common digestive disorders. She has authored multiple gastroenterology publications and has presented her research at national and international conferences.

Lin Chang, MD. UCLA Medical Center (Los Angeles). Dr. Chang is vice chief of UCLA Health’s Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases. She is also the director of the GI fellowship training program.

Swati Chaudhari, MD. Bellin Health Gastroenterology (Green Bay, Wis.). In addition to gastroenterology, Dr. Chaudhari specializes in hepatology and colon cancer screenings. She treats adults and seniors.

Chukwunonso Chime, MD. Western Wisconsin Health Main Campus (Baldwin). Dr. Chime has a special interest in managing upper GI disorders, liver and gallbladder related diseases, and more. He has been practicing since 2016.

Nancy Chung, MD. Vanguard Gastroenterology (New York City). Before joining Vanguard Gastroenterology, Dr. Chung had over a decade of experience serving patients throughout Westchester, N.Y., and the Bronx borough of New York City. She practices general gastroenterology with a focus on colon cancer screening and prevention.

Jermaine Clarke, DO. Grayson Digestive Disease Consultants (Sherman, Texas). Dr. Clarke has been the owner of Grayson Digestive Disease Consultants since 2015. Before his current role, he was a gastroenterologist at Sherman Gastroenterology Associates in the Sherman-Denison metropolitan area.

Douglas Corley, MD, PhD. Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center. Dr. Corley is also an associate member of the University of California San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center and a research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research. His research projects include esophageal adenocarcinoma and the carcinogenic effects of obesity.

Bradley Creel, MD. Atlanta Gastroenterology. Dr. Creel has been with Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates since 2011. He has clinical interests in the effects of HIV on the GI tract, treatment of hepatitis B and C, gastroesophageal reflux disease and more.

Erica Dailey, DO. Kansas City Gastroenterology & Hepatology Physicians Group (Overland Park, Kan.). Dr. Dailey believes in treating patients like family. She has clinical interests in inflammatory bowel diseases, infectious gastroenterology, screening, prevention and more. She enjoys volunteering, providing mentorship to women in medicine and attending medical mission trips.

Paul Dambowy, MD. MNGI Digestive Health (Minneapolis). Dr. Dambowy was recently appointed CMO at MNGI Digestive Health. He was previously the organization’s site medical director at its Woodbury (Minn.) Endoscopy Center and Clinic.

Steven Desautels, MD. Alta View Hospital (Sandy, Utah), Riverton (Utah) Hospital and Lone Peak Hospital (Draper, Utah). Dr. Desautels has been awarded for his clinical research by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the American College of Gastroenterology and the American College of Physicians. He specializes in esophageal disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cancer of the GI tract, functional disorders of the GI tract and therapeutic endoscopy.

Manish Dhamija, MD. Advanced GI (Chicago). Dr. Dhamija has more than 10 years of clinical GI experience. He is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Shirley Donelson, MD. GI Associates & Endoscopy Center (Madison and Flowood, Miss.). Dr. Donelson joined GI Associates in June 2015. She is a fellow of the American Medical Association and the Mississippi State Medical Association.

Kulwinder Dua, MD. Froedtert Hospital (Milwaukee). Dr. Dua is also a professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. His research has been published more than 200 times in peer-reviewed journals, and he is a member of several editorial boards.

Rachel Dunn, MD. Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital (Indianapolis). Dr. Dunn has a special interest in eosinophilic esophagitis, celiac disease, nutrition and interventional procedures. She is a member of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the American College of Gastroenterology.

Noel Fajardo, MD. Las Vegas Gastroenterology. Dr. Fajardo is former clinical instructor at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn. His research interests include experimental treatments for neuropathic gastrointestinal disorders.

Helen Fasanya-Uptagraft, MD. Midwest Endoscopy Services (Omaha, Neb.). Dr. Fasanya-Uptagraft’s clinical interests include inflammatory bowel disease management and treatment, and she has presented her research on the topic at national conferences. She is a professional member of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America.

William Faubion Jr., MD. Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minn.). Dr. Faubion also has an NIH-funded lab focused on immune causes of gastrointestinal diseases. He is a member of the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

Peter Fenton, MD. Utah Gastroenterology (Salt Lake City). Dr. Fenton has special interest in hepatology, inflammatory bowel disease and esophageal disorders. He is affiliated with Riverton Hospital, Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Mountain West Endoscopy Center in Salt Lake City and Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful, which are all in Utah.

Michael Flicker, MD. Advanced GI (Chicago). Dr. Flicker is a co-founder of Advanced GI. He is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Dr. Mauricio Garcia Saenz de Sicilia. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Little Rock). Dr. Garcia was recently appointed chief of the division of gastroenterology and hepatology and as an associate professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences department of internal medicine. Before coming into his new role, he worked at UAMS as director of the primary liver tumors clinic in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology and as co-director of gastroenterology and hepatology services.

Samuel Giordano, MD. Cooper University Digestive (Camden, N.J.). Dr. Giordano is also an assistant professor of medicine at the Cooper Medical School of Glassboro, N.J.-based Rowan University. His special interests include general gastroenterology, colorectal cancer screening, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux and nutrition.

Eric Goldberg, MD. University of Maryland Medical System (Baltimore). Dr. Goldberg is the clinical director and associate chief of gastroenterology. His specialties include advanced therapeutic endoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to treat disorders of the pancreas and bile ducts.

Joshua Goldman, MD. Portland (Maine) Gastroenterology Center. Before joining Portland Gastroenterology Center, Dr. Goldman served as president of Gastroenterology Affiliates of Southeastern Massachusetts in Brockton for nine years. His interests include colon cancer prevention, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and management of upper GI disorders.

Deepinder Goyal, MD. Gastro Health (Miami). Dr. Goyal is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology’s Practice Management committee and FDA related matters committee, and the Florida Gastrointestinal Society Federal Advocacy committee. He has won several awards, including a T32 research grant from the National Institute of Health.

Cory Halliburton, MD. Vermont Gastroenterology (Colchester). Dr. Halliburton’s clinical interests include inflammatory bowel disease and liver diseases. He is a staff member at University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington and has full attending privileges.

Andrew Heiner, MD. Granite Peaks Gastroenterology (Sandy, Utah). Dr. Heiner has been in practice for more than 20 years. His goal is to provide meaningful help to patients in need. He is affiliated with Alta View Hospital in Sandy and Lone Peak Hospital in Draper, both in Utah.

David Hockenbery, MD. University of Washington (Seattle). Dr. Hockenbery leads the gastroenterology and hepatology section at the hospital. He is a member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. He also heads a lab dedicated to the study of apoptosis.

Dale Holly, MD. Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates. Dr. Holly is a diplomate of the American Subspecialty Board of Gastroenterology. In 2012, he was recognized as one of Atlanta’s 25 most influential African American physicians by the Black Health Medical Research Foundation.

Nooshin Hosseini, MD. Vanguard Gastroenterology (New York City). Dr. Hosseini has published more than 10 peer-reviewed papers, clinical reviews and abstracts. She was named an emerging liver scholar while she was a trainee at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

Roger Huey, MD. Digestive Health Specialists (Tupelo, Miss.). Dr. Huey has been with Digestive Health Specialists since 2005. He previously served as chief medical resident at University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson. He practiced privately in Greenwood, Miss., before moving to Tupelo in 2003.

Lyle Hurwitz, MD. Gastroenterology Associates of Florida (Atlantis). Dr. Hurwitz has done research on colorectal cancer screening, gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel and more. He has performed more than 15,000 procedures during his career.

Andrew Ippoliti, MD. Keck Hospital of USC (Los Angeles). Dr. Ippoliti is the associate chief of gastroenterology and is a clinical medicine professor at the USC Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles. He has served on several advisory boards and lectured at medical centers nationwide.

Pothen Jacob, MD. Gastro Florida (Clearwater). Dr. Jacob has a special interest in motility disorders, liver disease and colon cancer screening. He has been practicing privately in Pinellas County since 1990. He is also a member of the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Gastroenterology.

Kambiz Kadkhodayan, MD. AdventHealth (Orlando, Fla.). Dr. Kadkhodayan is the program director of the advanced endoscopy fellowship at AdventHealth’s Center for Interventional Endoscopy. His clinical interests include management of patients with obesity and complex gastrointestinal diseases.

Patricia Kao, MD. Salem (Ore.) Gastro. Dr. Kao has practiced at Salem Gastro since 2007 in addition to having hospital privileges at Salem Hospital and West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Ore. She is also a staff member of Salem Endoscopy, an ASC and sister company of Salem Gastro.

Michael Kattah, MD. UCSF Medical Center (San Francisco). Dr. Kattah is also an assistant professor at the University of California San Francisco. His research focuses on why people develop inflammatory bowel disease and how to choose the best medications for each patient.

Jaffrey Kazi, MD. Scottsdale (Ariz.) Gastroenterology Specialists. Dr. Kazi does clinical research trials for conditions such as celiac disease and encephalopathy. He has a special interest in advanced endoscopies, bile duct disorders and pancreas disorders.

Ambreen Khurshid, MD. California Gastroenterology Associates (Fresno). Dr. Khurshid is affiliated with University of California San Francisco Fresno’s department of gastroenterology as teaching faculty. She has a special interest in GI disorders in women.

Joseph Kim, MD. North Texas Gastroenterology Associates (Sherman and Anna, Texas). Dr. Kim is certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. He also has advanced training in endoscopy and has written two book chapters.

Karen Kim, MD. The University of Chicago Medicine. Dr. Kim is a professor of medicine and associate director of the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is the director of the Center for Asian Health Equity and has an interest in researching underserved and minority populations, health disparities, cultural competency and cancer prevention.

Lawrence Kim, MD. South Denver Gastroenterology (Parker, Colo.). Dr. Kim was the first gastroenterologist to join the board of directors of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care.

Hack Jae Kim, MD. Arizona Centers for Digestive Health (Phoenix). Dr. Kim has 21 years of experience in gastroenterology. He has expertise in esophageal cancer, gastrointestinal motility, colon cancer and more. He has been published in various gastroenterology journals including the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Gut, and Neurogastroenterology & Motility.

David Kim, MD. Illinois Gastroenterology Group (Peoria). Dr. Kim is the medical director of the Chicago-based Amita Health Hepatitis C clinic and also serves on the American Liver Foundation’s medical advisory committee.

Michelle Kim, MD, PhD. Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Kim was recently named the chair of the department of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at Cleveland Clinic’s Digestive Disease & Surgery Institute. She is the first woman to hold the position at Cleveland Clinic.

Divyanshoo Kohli, MD. Providence Digestive Health Institute (Spokane, Wash.). Dr. Kohli was recently appointed to the GI specialty board on the American Board of Internal Medicine. He also practices at the Providence Digestive Health Institute as an endoscopist.

Kavita Kongara, MD. Atlanta Gastroenterology. Dr. Kongara’s work has been published in journals such as The American Journal of Gastroenterology, The Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology and more. She has served Atlanta Gastroenterology since 2010.

Karen Kormis, MD. PA GI Consultants (Camp Hill, Pa.). Dr. Kormis has a special interest in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases. She has been treating patients at PA GI since 1996.

Mary Kovalak, MD. South Denver Gastroenterology (Englewood, Colo.). Dr. Kovalak’s research interests include eosinophilic esophagitis. She is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Jose Lantin, MD. Gastroenterology of Westchester (Yonkers, N.Y.). Dr. Lantin is the CEO of Gastroenterology of Westchester. He has more than 30 years of experience and treats a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel diseases and acute and chronic pancreatitis.

Daryl Lau, MD. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston). Dr. Lau is the director of translational liver research at the hospital. She is also an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Gregory Lesser, MD. NJ Gastro (Newark, N.J.). Dr. Lesser has co-written publications on sedation and colonoscopy as well as other gastroenterology topics. He is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Gastroenterological Association.

Daus Mahnke, MD. Gastroenterology of the Rockies (Louisville, Colo.). Dr. Mahnke is also a clinical instructor of medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. He is also a member of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America Medical Advisory Board.

Pramod Malik, MD. Virginia Gastroenterology (Suffolk). Dr. Malik established Virginia Gastroenterology in 2016. He is a board member of the Virginia Gastroenterological Society and a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Thalia Mayes, MD. Portland (Maine) Gastroenterology Center. In addition to her work at Portland Gastroenterology Center, Dr. Mayes is a clinical assistant professor at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. She is also a member of Maine Medical Center’s medical staff in Portland.

Leon McLean, MD, PhD. Granite State Gastroenterology (Derry, N.H.). Dr. McLean is a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. He is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, the American College of Gastroenterology and other organizations.

Gil Melmed, MD. Cedars-Sinai (Los Angeles). Dr. Melmed recently joined virtual gastrointestinal care company Oshi Health’s medical advisory board. He is also a member of the National Scientific Advisory Council for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and is a co-chair of the foundation’s IBD Qorus quality improvement program.

Shoba Mendu, MD. Gastroenterology Associates of Tidewater (Chesapeake, Va.). Dr. Mendu was previously chief medical resident of Detroit Receiving Hospital. She has been with Gastroenterology Associates of Tidewater since 2010 and has advanced training in colorectal cancer screening, IBD, capsule endoscopy and women’s digestive health.

Shane Mills, MD. Eugene Gastroenterology (Springfield, Ore.). Dr. Mills served as chief of gastroenterology at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso,Texas from 2008-13. He has special interests in colorectal cancer screening and prevention, liver disease and more.

Thomas Mills, MD. Digestive Healthcare Clinic (Jackson, Miss.). Dr. Mills is self-employed and has his own independent private practice in Jackson. He is also the former chair of the St. Dominic Hospital Endoscopy Committee.

Smruti Mohanty, MD. Beth Israel Medical Center (Newark, N.J.). Dr. Mohanty was recently named director of gastroenterology at Beth Israel Medical Center. He has more than 20 years of gastroenterology experience and specializes in liver transplants and liver disease.

Angela Nutt, MD. GastroArkansas (Little Rock). Dr. Nutt has been with GastroArkansas since 1999. She also serves as vice chair of gastroenterology at Baptist Medical Center in Little Rock.

Jadesola Omoyeni, MD. Gastroenterology Consultants of San Antonio. Dr. Omoyeni’s clinical interests include preventing colon cancer using high-value care and cost-effective treatments. She has also published articles about bariatric surgery and liver diseases.

Haleh Pazwash, MD. Gastroenterology Associates of New Jersey (Ridgewood). In addition to practicing at the Gastroenterology Associates of New Jersey, Dr. Pazwash is also chair of the division of gastroenterology at Valley Hospital in Ridgewood. Before her current roles, she served as Valley Hospital’s chair of the endoscopy committee until 2017. Dr. Pazwash has also volunteered as an associate clinical professor at St. Vincent’s Catholic Medical Center in New York City.

Elizabeth Raskin, MD. Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian (Newport Beach, Calif.). Dr. Raskin was recently named surgical director for the Margolis Family Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program, which is part of the Hoag Digestive Institute. She has 20 years of experience in colon and rectal surgeries.

Nitesh Ratnakar, MD. West Virginia Gastroenterology & Endoscopy (Elkins). Dr. Ratnakar serves as the West Virgina governor of the American College of Gastroenterology. He is also a member of the task force of the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy on innovation in endoscopy.

Alexis Rodriguez, MD. Center for Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition (Evergreen Park and Elmhurst, Ill.). Dr. Rodriguez has experience managing inflammatory bowel disease, abdominal pain, hepatitis and more. She is affiliated with several Chicago-area hospitals.

Lisa Rossi, MD. Connecticut Gastroenterology Associates (Hartford). Dr. Rossi is a clinical instructor in the department of medicine at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in Farmington. She is also the university’s GI fellowship site director at Saint Francis Hospital in Hartford.

Lauren Schwartz, MD. Manhattan Gastroenterology (New York City). Dr. Schwartz has a special interest in general gastroenterology, women’s health, colon cancer screening and more. Her evaluations and treatment plans often include nutritional interventions and lifestyle modifications. She is a member of various organizations including the American Gastroenterological Association, American College of Gastroenterology and more.

Nikrad Shahnavaz, MD. Emory University Hospital (Atlanta). Dr. Shahnavaz is also an associate professor at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. He has published several scientific articles, co-authored a book on gastroenterology and has presented at conferences internationally.

Aniq Shaikh, MD. Gastroenterology Consultants of Central Florida (Orlando). Dr. Shaikh is chief of medicine at Florida Hospital East Orlando. He is also a member of the American College of Gastroenterology and Association of Pakistani Physicians of North America.

Sunana Sohi, MD. Louisville (Ky.) Gastroenterology Associates. Dr. Sohi has been practicing at Louisville Gastroenterology Associates since 2010. She is a member of the American Medical Association, the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Lidia Spaho, MD. Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital (Winfield, Ill.). Dr. Spaho serves at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital, a 390-bed acute care facility. She is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in both gastroenterology and internal medicine.

Christian Stone, MD. Comprehensive Digestive Institute of Nevada (Las Vegas). Dr. Stone has been practicing in Las Vegas since 2009. His research has resulted in more than 100 published book chapters, invited reviews and original manuscripts in peer-reviewed medical journals.

Doris Strader, MD. The University of Vermont Medical Center (Burlington). Dr. Strader runs a liver clinic at the University of Vermont Medical Center. She has been conducting gastroenterology and hepatology clinical treatment trials for over 10 years. She is the principal investigator for a clinical trial of eosinophilic esophagitis and co-investigator in treatment trials of hepatitis C and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

Alejandro Suarez, MD. Palmetto Digestive Health Specialists (Charleston, S.C.). In addition to his role at Palmetto Digestive Health Specialists, Dr. Suarez is also an assistant professor adjunct at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. He has special interest in GI oncology, pancreaticobiliary disorders and interventional endoscopy.

Andrew Su, MD. Gateway Gastroenterology (Chesterfield, Mo.). Dr. Su has been with Gateway Gastroenterology since 1996. He has an interest in technological advances in endoscopy. He is a member of the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Abdulla Taja, MD. Gastroenterology of West Central Ohio (Lima). Dr. Taja has more than 25 years of experience and has served at Cook County Hospital in Chicago as well as at his own practice. His focus is on preventive care and early detection.

Mark Tanchel, MD. Gastroenterology Associates of New Jersey (Hackensack). Dr. Tanchel has over two decades of private practice experience. He serves as a gastroenterologist at Gastroenterology Associates of New Jersey and senior attending physician at Hackensack University Medical Center.

Clinton Wallis, MD. Digestive Disease Specialists (Oklahoma City). Dr. Wallis is board-certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology. He has been with Digestive Disease Specialists since 2006. Dr. Clinton is a member of a variety of organizations including the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Society of Gastroenterological Endoscopy and more.

Timothy Wang, MD. Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons (New York City). Dr. Wang was recently appointed the inaugural member of a medical advisory board for Mainz Biomed. He is also the Dorothy L. and Daniel H. Silverberg Professor of Medicine and GI division chief at the Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

James Weber, MD. GI Alliance (Southlake, Texas). Dr. Webster is the founder and CEO of independent gastroenterology provider network GI Alliance. He also founded Texas Digestive Disease Consultants in 1995.

Joseph Webster, MD. Digestive and Liver Center of Florida (Orlando). Dr. Webster’s research interests include obesity and diabetes in children and adolescents and the role of families in healthy attitudes and living. He is a member of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a diplomate of the American Board of Gastroenterology.

Tony Weiss, MD. New York Gastroenterology Associates (New York City). Dr. Weiss is an assistant professor of medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He also serves as the school’s director of regulatory affairs/associate program director of the division of gastroenterology.

Richard Wille, MD. Center for Digestive Health (Troy, Mich.). In addition to his role at the Center for Digestive Health, Dr. Wille is also the director of the endoscopy unit at William Beaumont Hospital in Troy. In 1993, he served as the chief medical resident at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He has presented papers about gastrointestinal diseases at national conferences.

Louis Wong Kee Song, MD. Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minn.). Dr. Wong Kee Song has been with the Mayo Clinic since 1998 and has a special interest in therapeutic endoscopy. In addition to his clinical work, he is also a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Renee Young, MD. University of Nebraska Medical Center (Omaha). Dr. Young is a professor in the Internal Medicine Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine. She has served the medical center since 1990. She is interested in medical student, resident and fellow education.

And finally, of course, you’re always welcome here at Gastro Health Partners, who have 18 specialists on staff for your gastroenterological needs. Visit our Patient Portal to get started on your journey to a healthier you!

Coronavirus Updates

November 23rd, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 132nd weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 228,154,832 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/16/22. This is 68.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,598,169 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/21/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,843,534 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/15/22. This is 55.3% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 18th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 131st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 228,154,832 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/16/22. This is 68.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,597,286 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/14/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,843,534 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/15/22. This is 55.3% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 11th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 130th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 227,802,408 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/09/22. This is 68.6% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,596,390 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/07/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,841,919 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/08/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 4th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 129th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 227,377,753 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/02/22. This is 68.5% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,595,253 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/31/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,840,146 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/01/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 25th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 128th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 226,594,560 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/19/22. This is 68.2% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,593,862 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/24/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,836,037 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/18/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 18th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 127th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 226,200,755 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/12/22. This is 68.1% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,592,619 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/17/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,834,506 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/12/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 11th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 126th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 225,870,613 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/06/22. This is 68% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,590,358 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/03/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here. (No update)
    • 3,832,168 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/04/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 4th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 125th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 225,284,115 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/28/22. This is 67.9% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,590,358 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/03/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,829,486 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/27/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 27th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 124th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,980,931 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/21/22. This is 67.8% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,579,651 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/26/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,828,893 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/25/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 20th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 123st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,636,858 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/14/22. This is 67.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,587,775 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/19/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,826,606 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/18/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 13th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 122st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,367,691 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/7/22. This is 67.6% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,585,575 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/12/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,824,492 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/11/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

September 7th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 121st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,113,439 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 8/31/22. This is 67.5% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,584,233 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/6/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,821,535 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/1/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

August 31th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 120th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 223,914,723 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 8/24/22. This is 67.4% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,581,875 individuals are fully vaccinated in Kentucky as of 8/29/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,819,773 individuals are fully vaccinated in Indiana as of 8/28/22. This is 54.9% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

August 15th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 119th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

July 25th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 118th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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July 19th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 117th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

 

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July 12th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 116th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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July 6th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 115th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 28th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 114th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 20th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 113th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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June 14th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 112th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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June 9th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 111th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

10 Things You Should Know About Hemochromatosis

Hemochromatosis is a medical condition where an abnormal amount of additional iron builds up in a person’s blood to the point of potentially causing bodily harm and damage to the liver, heart, endocrine glands, joints and more. Research suggests that in the U.S., approximately one out of every 300 non-Hispanic Caucasians suffers from hereditary hemochromatosis, with the majority being of northern European decent. 

The most common cause of hemochromatosis is hereditary and determined by genetics. Classic or hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic condition that often does not appear until people hit middle age. 

Interestingly, hemochromatosis is significantly more common among males, with estimates suggesting that men are affected two to three times more frequently than women.  Additionally, the initial onset of this inherited disease tends to be slightly earlier in men.  This is because women are somewhat “protected” by menstrual blood loss earlier in life.  

For more information about hemochromatosis including important facts you should know, follow along.

10 Things to Know About Hemochromatosis 

  1. While hemochromatosis was initially discovered sometime during the 1800s, by 1935 it was known as an inherited condition resulting from too much iron in the body.
  2. While some people are asymptomatic, common symptoms associated with hemochromatosis include: fatigue, hyperpigmentation of the skin, pain in the joints, stomach pain, weight loss, and decreased libido. 
  3. Serious complications associated with hemochromatosis include diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis of the liver and heart failure.
  4. While most cases of hemochromatosis are caused by hereditary factors, it is also possible to get hemochromatosis from a buildup of iron due to things like blood transfusions used to treat severe cases of anemia.
  5. Hemochromatosis can lead to a variety of liver abnormalities including: hepatomegaly or liver enlargement, liver scarring/cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and liver disease. Additionally, hepatocellular carcinoma, a certain type of liver cancer, is sometimes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis. 
  6. Sometimes hemochromatosis impacts the color of a person’s skin, changing it to more of a bronze or gray coloring.  In the 1800s, it was called “bronze diabetes” and “pigmented cirrhosis.”  
  7. If you suffer from hemochromatosis, one of the most effective ways to lower the amount of iron in your body tends to be regularly scheduled removal of blood. 
  8. People who have family members (especially siblings) that are diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis may want to consider genetic testing.
  9. Hemochromatosis is often initially diagnosed with a blood test. When someone has a high ratio of iron to transferrin in their blood, it may suggest they are suffering from hemochromatosis.  The disease can be confirmed with a blood test to look for the genes causing hemochromatosis.  
  10. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute, HFE, the gene that causes hereditary hemochromatosis, was first identified in 1996 on chromosome 6.

Hemochromatosis is a manageable condition that can be extremely serious if undiagnosed or left untreated. For more information or to arrange diagnostic testing, you should seek out assistance from a qualified medical professional. 

If you or someone you love is suffering from hemochromatosis, the experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you. Our clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system. For more information or to schedule a gastroenterological medical evaluation, contact a Gastro Health Partners location near you.

 

Sudden Difficulty Swallowing? Here’s What It Is, And What Could Be Causing It

Ever experienced pain, discomfort, or difficulty while attempting to swallow? This condition is known as dysphagia. Dysphagia is highly common–around 13.5% of the population experiences it at some time–and it is caused by a variety of different medical conditions and diseases.

There are two main types of dysphagia: oropharyngeal and esophageal.

Oropharyngeal dysphagia is associated with the muscles of the mouth and upper throat. When muscles are weakened due to neurological and nervous system disorders, the act of swallowing may become difficult. This can also feel like a numbness of the throat, resulting in an inability to “feel” food. Multiple sclerosis, a stroke, Parkinson’s, and other brain disorders are associated with oropharyngeal symptoms.

Esophageal dysphagia is usually associated with a physical narrowing of the esophagus or motility issues of the esophagus and upper stomach. Some muscular conditions, such as muscle spasms, throat cancer, or diverticulum, can make it difficult to fully swallow food, resulting in discomfort. Physical blockages related to benign/cancerous growth or strictures may cause esophageal dysphagia.

Esophageal dysphagia is also a frequent symptom of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD), or chronic acid reflux. GERD is a result of dysfunction of the esophageal sphincter, a muscle in the esophagus. Normally, when you swallow, the esophageal sphincter muscle relaxes to allow food and liquid to enter your stomach. In GERD, the muscle relaxes abnormally or weakens, allowing stomach acid to enter the esophagus. This results in chronic discomfort, heartburn, chest pain, regurgitation, nausea, and dysphagia. In the long-term, GERD can lead to scarring and Barrett’s Esophagus, which is an abnormal change in the lining of the esophagus which can increase your risk for esophageal cancer.  

While dysphagia is most common in older populations, it can really happen to anyone. Dysphagia is almost always a symptom of another underlying condition. If you experience severe symptoms of dysphagia, seek immediate medical assistance. 

If you experience dysphagia as a symptom of GERD, consider consulting a gastroenterologist. There are ways you can address symptoms of GERD to reduce severity and chronic symptoms. Some risk factors of GERD include obesity, hiatal hernia, pregnancy, smoking, asthma, diabetes, overeating, and connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma. To learn more about heartburn, acid reflux, and GERD, click here. If you have been diagnosed with GERD and wish to manage symptoms through dietary choices, read our blog here.

If you are suffering from chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, the experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you. Our clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system. For more information or to schedule a gastroenterological medical evaluation, contact a Gastro Health Partners location near you.

 

Unlocking The Gut-Brain Connection | Mental Health Awareness Month 2022

May is #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth, a time to amplify the stories of the millions of Americans experiencing mental health conditions as well as promote valuable resources and information concerning mental health statistics and treatment options. Using the hashtag #TogetherForMH, you can share your story or explore other’s across social media platforms. 

During the pandemic, global prevalence of anxiety and depression has increased by at least 25%, according to the World Health Organization. Nearly 56% of all young adults report symptoms of anxiety and depression. What’s more, negative impacts of pandemic stressors have leached into daily life as well: 36% of adults report difficulty sleeping, 32% report issues with eating, 12% report increases in alcohol consumption and substance abuse, and 12% report worsening of pre-existing chronic conditions.  

In the midst of this unprecedented mental health crisis, finding treatment options that are beneficial and sustainable is of the utmost importance. Of course, seeking help can be difficult. Small steps, such as discussing your symptoms with your doctor, a psychiatrist, or even beginning with a trusted relative or friend, is essential. The National Institute of Mental Health has compiled these valuable resources, such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, the Mental Health Information Glossary, and a Tips for Talking to Your Mental Health Provider Factsheet

What is the Gut-Brain Connection?

As gastroenterologists, we treat a variety of digestive conditions, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Colon and Colorectal Cancer, Heartburn, Acid Reflux, and GERD, Constipation, and much more. 

These digestive conditions may sound completely removed from mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, but they are actually explicitly linked. In recent years, we’ve discovered that there’s a “second brain” in the gut, often referred to as the enteric nervous system (ENS), which directly responds to physicochemical stimuli, produces serotonin and other chemicals that affect how the brain works, and even regulates immune response. This leads to the “gut-brain connection” (GBC), which is the back-and-forth relationship between gut health and brain health. Many functional bowel conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia, and their symptoms, such as bloating, constipation, diarrhea, occur more frequently in people who experience anxiety, depression, and emotional shifts. Essentially, we’ve found that addressing mental health conditions and keeping stress under control can result in relief from certain digestive conditions; while, in turn, treating your digestive conditions and gut health can help improve your mental health.

New research, published in Molecular Psychiatry this month has found links between certain immune abnormalities in the brain and the gut in people with idiopathic autism. Another study found the impacts of gut microbiome diversity and intestinal flora on your food cravings, and another found connections between certain microbial composition and whether or not you’re a “morning person” or “night owl.” Certainly, we are at the forefront of understanding the numerous impacts of the gut-brain connection.

How can you begin to address your gut health?

We’ve written a lot about this! Beyond seeking diagnosis and treatment for specific medical conditions, you can improve the diversity of your gut microbiome through eating specific foods, taking probiotics, exercising, getting more sleep, and finding ways to manage stress. If you’re interested in learning more about the “#guthealth” trend that has taken the internet by storm, read our blog here. If you want to read more about diet, and in particular the importance of fiber, read our blog here

The experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you if you are concerned about your gut health or have other gastroenterological issues. For more information or to schedule an appointment at one of our Kentucky or Southern Indiana offices, contact one of our practice locations near you.  

Coronavirus Updates

May 23, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 111th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 16, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 110th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 10, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 109th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 30, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 108th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 16, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 107th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 9, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 106th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 2, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 105th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 26, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 104th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 19, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 103rd weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 12, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 102nd weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 5, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 101st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 27, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our one-hundredth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 20, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 13, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 6, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 30, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 20, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 13, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 6, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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Dec 30, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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Dec 23, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninety-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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Dec 16, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our ninetieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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Dec 9, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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Dec 3, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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November 25, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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November 18, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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November 11, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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November 4, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 28, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 22, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 14, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eighty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 7, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our eightieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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September 30, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 20, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 13, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 7, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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August 30, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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August 25, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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August 11, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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August 6, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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July 28, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventy-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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July 21, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our seventieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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July 14, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures.

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July 8, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 24, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 17, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 10, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 3, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 27, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 20, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 13, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 6, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our sixtieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 29, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our fifty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 22, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our fifty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 15, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our fifty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 8, 2021

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices, including those in Indiana where the mask mandate has recently been lifted. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our fifty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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April 1, 2021

This is our fifty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 25, 2021

This is our fifty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 18, 2021

This is our fifty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 11, 2021

This is our fifty-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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March 4, 2021

This is our fifty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 25, 2021

This is our fiftieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 18, 2021

This is our forty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 11, 2021

This is our forty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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February 4, 2021

This is our forty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 28, 2021

This is our forty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 21, 2021

This is our forty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 14, 2021

This is our forty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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January 7, 2021

This is our forty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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December 31st, 2020

This is our forty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find
updated facts and figures.

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • The FDA has granted emergency use authorization for two coronavirus vaccines: one from Pfizer/BioNTech and one from Moderna. Both Moderna and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine have shown similar efficacy levels of 95%, and both vaccines require two doses administered several weeks apart.
    • Senior US government officials have started receiving their vaccinations and the CDC is recommending that essential frontline workers such as health care workers and nursing home staff as well as nursing home residents, older adults over 74 and those with previous underlying health conditions be among those first in line to receive theirs.
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has.
  • Coronavirus cases surge across the United States
    • Coronavirus cases continue to spike in the United States.
    • Kentucky and Indiana continue to see record-breaking coronavirus case numbers as well.
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • Private social gatherings are limited to a maximum of two households and a maximum of eight people per an executive order December 14th.
      • All public and private schools (K -12) to cease in-person instruction. Middle and high schools will remain in remote or virtual instruction until at least Jan. 4, 2021.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On Thursday, December 10, Governor Holcomb issued Executive Order 20-50. This order increases some restrictions in Indiana between December 13 and January 3, as the state sees continued growth in coronavirus cases. Restrictions include postponing non-emergency surgeries and canceling local health department waivers on social gathering restrictions. You can read the order here and detailed requirements here.
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here.

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December 17, 2020

This is our fortieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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December 10, 2020

This is our thirty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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December 3, 2020

This is our thirty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • On Wednesday, December 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revised guidelines for people exposed to coronavirus. Previously, a 14 day quarantine was recommended if you had a potential exposure. The CDC still recommends this as the best way to mitigate disease spread. However, there are two new alternatives in light of more research. Quarantine can end after 10 days if you do not develop symptoms, or after 7 days if you develop no symptoms and also test negative. 
    • On Wednesday, December 2, the United Kingdom authorized emergency use for the Pfizer/BioNTech developed vaccine. 
    • Several potential vaccines are in final testing phases. 12 are currently in Phase 3 trials. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has. 
  • Coronavirus cases surge across the United States
    • Coronavirus cases remain high in the United States.
    • Kentucky and Indiana continue to see record-breaking coronavirus case numbers.
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On November 30, Governor Beshear and Dr. Steven Stack announced that Kentucky will receive around 38,000 doses of a coronavirus vaccine as early as mid-December. These initial vaccines will be allocated to Long-Term Care Facilities and health care workers in hospitals. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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November 25th, 2020

This is our thirty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • Drug companies Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca have the leading COVID-19 vaccine candidates. Several others remain in development. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
    • A recent analysis found that the Pfizer vaccine is 95% effective. It is expected to be the first COVID-19 vaccine to receive FDA authorization and anticipates delivering doses before the end of 2020. 
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has. 
  • Coronavirus cases surge across the United States
    • Coronavirus cases continue to spike in the United States.
    • Kentucky and Indiana continue to see record-breaking coronavirus case numbers as well. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • Governor Beshear’s new restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus went into effect on Friday, November 20th and will remain in effect until December 13th. 
      • Restaurants and bars are not open for indoor food or beverage consumption. Carryout and delivery are encouraged as well as socially distance outdoor seating.
      • Private social gatherings are limited to up to eight people from a maximum of two households.
      • Gyms, fitness centers, pools, and other indoor recreation facilities are limited to a 33% capacity. Group classes, team practices and competitions are prohibited. Masks must be worn while exercising.
      • Venues, event spaces and theaters will be limited to 25 people per room. This applies to indoor weddings and funerals, but excludes in-person worship services, for which the Governor will provide recommendations Thursday.
      • Office-based businesses are limited to a 33% capacity for employees. All employees who are able to work from home must do so and all businesses that can close to the public must do so.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
    • On November 13, Governor Holcomb issued an executive order effective through December 12th, detailing a color-coding system for counties in Indiana that details necessary steps to curb the spread of COVID-19. Read the executive order here and the county metrics and requirements here.  
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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November 19, 2020

This is our thirty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • On Monday, November 16, biotechnology company Moderna announced significant early trial results for its coronavirus vaccine. The vaccine is 94.5% effective. 
    • On Monday, November 9, pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced positive early trial results for its coronavirus vaccine. An analysis found that the Pfizer vaccine was over 90% effective.
    • Several potential vaccines are in final testing phases. 12 are currently in Phase 3 trials. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has. 
  • Coronavirus cases surge across the United States
    • Coronavirus cases continue to spike in the United States.
    • Kentucky and Indiana continue to see record-breaking coronavirus case numbers as well. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On Wednesday, November 18, Governor Beshear announced new restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus. 
      • All public and private K-12 schools will close to in-person instruction starting Monday through the end of the semester (The only exception is for elementary schools in counties outside a red zone, which can reopen on December 7 if the school follows guidelines).
      • Beginning Friday, November 20 and lasting until Dec. 13:
  • All restaurants and bars will close to indoor dining services. Outdoor dining is still allowed, with some limitations.
  • Gyms are limited to 33% capacity, and no group classes or indoor games are allowed. Masks are required.
  • Indoor gatherings should be limited to two families, not exceeding a total of eight people.
  • Attendance at weddings and funerals is limited to 25 people.
  • Professional services should have employees work from home when possible and limit their offices to 33% capacity.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
    • On November 13, Governor Holcomb issued an executive order detailing a color-coding system for counties in Indiana that details necessary steps to curb the spread of COVID-19. Read the executive order here and the county metrics and requirements here.  
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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November 12, 2020

This is our thirty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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November 5, 2020

This is our thirty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 29, 2020

This is our thirty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • Several potential vaccines are in final testing phases. 11 are currently in Phase 3 trials. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has. 
  • Coronavirus cases surge across the United States
    • Coronavirus cases have spiked in the United States recently, with record-breaking daily numbers for several consecutive days. Daily new cases are now exceeding previous highs from July, and continue to rise. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On October 26, Governor Beshear issued new recommendations for counties in the red zone (25 or more average daily cases per 100,000 people). The recommendations are: 
      • Government offices that do not provide critical services should have their workers performing their duties virtually.
      • Employers should have employees who can work from home effectively work from home as much as possible.
      • Reduce in-person shopping and return to curbside pickup as much as possible.
      • Order takeout, avoid dining in at restaurants or bars.
      • Prioritize businesses that follow COVID-19 measures.
      • Do not host gatherings of any size.
      • Avoid nonessential activities outside the home.
      • Pause high-contact sports, minimize crowds at sporting events.
      • Follow all other COVID-19 mitigation efforts.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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October 22, 2020

This is our thirty-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine and treatment progress
    • Several potential vaccines are in final testing phases. 11 are currently in Phase 3 trials. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
    • Check on this treatment tracker from the New York Times to see what treatments are being used and what level of effectiveness and safety each has. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On October 19, Governor Beshear signed an executive order that ends the statewide moratorium on disconnections for nonpayment on Nov. 6, but takes additional steps to help Kentuckians. The executive order designates $15 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds for the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund, which will provide relief for Kentuckians at risk of natural gas, water, wastewater or electric service disconnection. The order will also require utilities to create a payment plan for residential customers that runs no less than six months. It will continue to waive late fees on utility bills for residential customers through Dec. 31, 2020. Read the order here
    • On October 16, ​The Kentucky Department for Public Health announced a draft plan for distributing a coronavirus vaccine to local health departments and health care organizations. Read the plan draft here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
    • On October 20, the Indiana Department of Health issued a draft coronavirus vaccine distribution plan. You can read the plan draft here
    • On October 15, Governor Holcomb issued an extension of Stage 5 of reopening until November 14. Read the order here
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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October 15, 2020

This is our thirty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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October 8, 2020

This is our thirtieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • Several potential vaccines are in final testing phases. 11 are currently in Phase 3 trials. Check out this vaccine tracker from the New York Times to see more about each potential vaccine’s progress. 
  • CDC updated its ‘How Coronavirus Spreads’ informational webpage 
    • The CDC recently acknowledged that the coronavirus can spread further than six feet in some instances. Here is an excerpt from their update: “Today’s update acknowledges the existence of some published reports showing limited, uncommon circumstances where people with COVID-19 infected others who were more than 6 feet away or shortly after the COVID-19-positive person left an area.  In these instances, transmission occurred in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise.  Such environments and activities may contribute to the buildup of virus-carrying particles.” You can read the full update here
    • See the How Coronavirus Spreads webpage here
  • White House coronavirus outbreak
    • On Thursday, October 1, President Trump announced he and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for coronavirus. This came soon after a positive test for Hope Hicks, a political advisor for the president. 
    • Since then, at least seven other administration officials and 13 other people who had been in close contact with the president have tested positive. 
    • On Friday, October 2, President Trump was admitted to Walter Reed Hospital Bethesda, Maryland for monitoring and treatment for the coronavirus. He left the hospital and returned to the White House on Monday, October 5. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On October 1, ​Governor Beshear and Dr. Stack announced guidance for Halloween. Read the guidelines here
    • On September 29, Governor Beshear announced that under a new Official Order from Transportation Secretary Jim Gray, the mail-in and drop box options for driver’s licenses were extended to licenses bearing an expiration date as late as Feb. 28, 2021, with all such renewals to be processed by March 31, 2021.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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October 1, 2020

This is our twenty-ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 24, 2020

This is our twenty-eighth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 17, 2020

This is our twenty-seventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 10, 2020

This is our twenty-sixth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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September 3rd, 2020

This is our twenty-fifth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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August 27, 2020

This is our twenty-fourth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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August 20, 2020

This is our twenty-third weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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August 13, 2020

This is our twenty-second weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
  • Midwest
    • The Midwest continues to see a rise in coronavirus cases. 
  • Progress on vaccine research and testing
    • A number of potential coronavirus vaccines have advanced to later phases of testing. A few have started Phase III Efficacy Trials, in which vaccines are given to thousands of people and placebos are given to others, and researchers wait to see how many people given the vaccine get infected versus those given a placebo. 
    • One of these trials receiving the most press attention in the United States is being conducted by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health. The first Phase III trial began on July 27. Eventually, around 30,000 people will be enrolled in the trial. 
    • See an overview of all potential vaccines and their relative progress in this tracker by the New York Times. 
    • In the United States, the FDA previously released a statement in June that any vaccine would need to protect at least 50% of people to be considered effective. 
    • On August 11, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Defense (DoD) announced an agreement with Moderna, Inc. to manufacture and deliver 100 million doses of the company’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate. Read more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
    • On August 11, allowed bars to reopen at 50% capacity and restaurants to increase capacity back to 50% for indoor dining. There will be an 11pm closing time mandated, with food and drink service having to end at 10pm. 
    • On August 10, recommended that school districts delay in-person learning until at least September 28. 
    • On August 6, extended the mask mandate for an additional 30 days. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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August 6, 2020

This is our twenty-first weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
    • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Midwest
    • The Midwest continues to see a rise in coronavirus cases, with Montana, Oklahoma, and Missouri experiencing some of the largest increases in percentages of infections in the past week or so. 
  • Progress on vaccine research and testing
    • A number of potential coronavirus vaccines have advanced to later phases of testing. A few have started Phase III Efficacy Trials, in which vaccines are given to thousands of people and placebos are given to others, and researchers wait to see how many people given the vaccine get infected versus those given a placebo. 
    • One of these trials receiving the most press attention in the United States is being conducted by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health. The first Phase III trial began on July 27. Eventually, around 30,000 people will be enrolled in the trial. 
    • See an overview of all potential vaccines and their relative progress in this tracker by the New York Times. 
    • In the United States, the FDA previously released a statement in June that any vaccine would need to protect at least 50% of people to be considered effective. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On July 30, Governor Holcomb ordered all counties in Indiana to extend Stage 4.5 of reopening to August 27. He also extended the prohibition on residential rental property evictions and mortgage foreclosures. He additionally ordered that all public and private K-12 schools have all students, staff, faculty, volunteers, vendors, and visitors wear a face covering or shield when on school grounds or in school buildings and facilities. Read the order here
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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July 30, 2020

This is our twentieth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of July 28, 52,942,145 total viral tests have been reported and 5,046,506 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 10% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Midwest at risk of surge in cases
    • Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee are showing warning signs of potential surges in coronavirus cases. Positive case numbers and positivity rates have been rising significantly in all three states over the past few weeks. 
    • Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, visited Kentucky on July 26 and recommended that the state close bars and reduce restaurant capacity to curb a potential surge. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On July 27, Governor Beshear announced new measures to curb a rising number of coronavirus cases in Kentucky. He announced that bars would close for two weeks starting July 28 and restaurant indoor capacity would be reduced to 25% of pre-pandemic capacity. He also recommended public and private schools avoid in-person instruction until the third week of August. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On July 24, Governor Holcomb issued a 30 day statewide mask order in effect starting July 27. All Indiana residents 8 and older are required to wear a face covering in indoor public spaces, outdoor public spaces where social distancing isn’t possible, and while using public transportation. Read the order here
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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July 23, 2020

This is our nineteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of July 22, 51,680,022 total viral tests have been reported and 4,878,379 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 10% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Emerging research
    • There is emerging evidence that the coronavirus can spread through small particles in the air. These smaller particles, which can spread when people talk or breathe, were previously not thought to be the main method of transmission- larger respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes were. This research may change recommendations and guidelines for masking and distancing in indoor spaces. Read more here
  • Increasing case numbers across the United States
    • The United States has seen coronavirus cases surge in recent weeks, with particularly high rates of increase in Southern and Western states including Florida, California, Arizona, and Texas. The seven day average of new cases across the United States stands just over 66,000.
  • Kentucky
    • Cases have started to rise significantly in Kentucky over the past two weeks, with the total case number growing past 24,000 and some of the highest single day case increases being recorded. 
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On July 20, the Kentucky Department of Public Health issued a new travel advisory that recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for travelers who went to any of eight states – Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Nevada, South Carolina and Texas – that were reporting a positive coronavirus testing rate equal to or greater than 15%. The advisory also includes Mississippi, which is quickly approaching a positive testing rate of 15%, and the U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico. Read more here
      • On July 20, the Cabinet for Health and Family Services issued a new order that pulls back on guidance covering social, non-commercial mass gatherings. On June 29, the original guidance was eased to allow for gatherings of 50 or fewer people. The new order returns the guidance to allow only for such gatherings of 10 or fewer people. The guidance, which does not apply to weddings, restaurants, retail or other public venues, went into effect on July 20 at 5 p.m. Read the order here
  • Indiana
    • Indiana has also started to see a rise in coronavirus cases after weeks of slow decline. 
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On July 16, Governor Holcomb ordered a continuation of Stage 4.5 of reopening Indiana (except for Elkhorn County) in light of increased coronavirus spread. This extension pushes Stage 5 to August 1. Read more here
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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July 16, 2020

This is our eighteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of July 14, 41,761,392 total viral tests have been reported and 3,754,729 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 9% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Emerging research
    • There is emerging evidence that the coronavirus can spread through small particles in the air. These smaller particles, which can spread when people talk or breathe, were previously not thought to be the main method of transmission- larger respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes were. This research may change recommendations and guidelines for masking and distancing in indoor spaces. Read more here
  • Increasing case numbers across the United States
    • The United States has seen coronavirus cases surge in recent weeks, with particularly high rates of increase in Southern and Western states including Florida, California, Arizona, and Texas. The seven day average of new cases across the United States stands just over 60,000, over three times higher than new case averages a month ago. 
  • Kentucky
    • Cases have started to rise significantly in Kentucky over the past week, with the total case number growing past 20,000 and some of the highest single day case increases. 
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On July 14, reminded Kentuckians that they can report noncompliance with coronavirus mandates through the reporting hotline at 833-KY SAFER (833-597-2337) or online at https://govstatus.egov.com/kysafer
      • On July 10, the Cabinet for Health and Family Services Department for Public Health issued an order related to health insurers and licensed clinician’s COVID-19 testing. Read the order here
      • On July 9, signed an executive order requiring Kentuckians to wear face coverings under several circumstances for the next 30 days. There are several exemptions to the order, including children who are 5 or younger and any person with a disability or a physical or mental impairment that prevents them from safely wearing a face covering. Read the order here
  • Indiana
    • Indiana has also started to see a rise in coronavirus cases after weeks of slow decline. 
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On July 8, issued a coronavirus screening guide for parents to use each day before school to help them decide if they need to keep their child/children home. Read the guide here
      • On July 7, issued guidance on when students, faculty, and staff can return to school after showing symptoms. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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July 9, 2020

This is our seventeenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of July 9, 39,208,278 total viral tests have been reported and 3,487,780 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 9% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Emerging research 
    • There is emerging evidence that the coronavirus can spread through small particles in the air. These smaller particles, which can spread when people talk or breathe, were previously not thought to be the main method of transmission- larger respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes were. This research may change recommendations and guidelines for masking and distancing in indoor spaces. Read more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On June 30, ​announced that the deadline to apply for Pandemic-Electronic Benefits Transfer (P-EBT) has been extended until the end of August. P-EBT provides equivalent funding for meals that students would have been provided in school this spring without the closures due to COVID-19. Read more here.
      • On June 30, ​announced Kentuckians who are uninsured can apply for short-term coverage through Medicaid Presumptive Eligibility. Families can apply online at chfs.ky.gov or benefind.ky.gov, by contacting an application assistant at healthbenefitexchange.ky.gov or by calling 855-459-6328. Initial coverage ends two months after the application month, unless the person applies for regular Medicaid or Presumptive The state is extending Presumptive Eligibility benefits for three months for anyone who already applied and whose coverage was previously set to end June 30. Read more here
      • On June 30, announced the state has hired Ernst & Young to help begin immediately processing outstanding claims that resulted from the COVID-19 global pandemic. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On July 6, created a COVID-19 Screening Decision Tree for schools as they prepare to reopen. See the document here
      • On July 1, announced Indiana would delay its transition to stage 5 of reopening. Instead, starting on July 4 and continuing through July 17 (for all counties except Elkhart), Indiana will enter phase 4.5. Phase 4.5 is similar to phase 4, and is intended to pause reopening plans as coronavirus cases increase around the nation. Read the Executive Order here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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July 2, 2020

This is our sixteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of July 1, 33,601,847 total viral tests have been reported and 3,194,381 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 10% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On June 29, visitation resumed at assisted living and personal care homes, group activities (10 or fewer) in facilities, communal dining and off-site appointments. On July 15, visitation will resume in nursing homes and in Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IIDs).
      • On June 24, Governor Beshear, Lieutenant Governor Jacqueline Coleman and Kevin Brown, interim commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Education, released initial guidance for Kentucky schools looking ahead to opening in the fall. Read the guidance here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On June 29, issued guidance and timelines for visitation in Long-term Care Facilities. Read the guidance here
      • On June 26, created an FAQ document regarding COVID-19 planning for schools and local health departments. Read the document here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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June 25, 2020

This is our fifteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of June 23, 30,110,061 total viral tests have been reported and 2,874,748 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 10% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On June 22, ​announced updated guidance beginning next week for many venues, including restaurants and bars. Read the requirements for restaurants and bars here. The new guidance also covers wedding venues and gatherings of 50 or fewer people. Read the requirements for gatherings of 50 or fewer people here
      • On June 18, ​announced the state would continue to expand in-person services to help Kentuckians resolve unemployment insurance claims. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On June 19, issued guidance on reducing indoor COVID-19 transmission through changing environmental factors. Read the guidance here
      • On June 18, updated guidance on making and wearing masks in public. Read the guidance here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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June 18, 2020

This is our fourteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of June 16, 23,765,801 total viral tests have been reported and 2,523,345 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 11% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On June 16, gave updated guidance on public pools and gatherings of up to 50 people. Read the pool guidance here and the guidance on gatherings here
      • On June 15, ​announced that Kentucky is currently performing mass testing of all inmates and staff members at the Kentucky Correctional Institute for Women (KCIW) in Shelby County. TThree staffers and 11 inmates recently tested positive for COVID-19. More than 270 of the facility’s 639 inmates have been tested thus far. Fortunately, no one from the facility has been hospitalized. Read more here
      • On June 15, announced that contact tracers will call people who may have been exposed from 1-844-KYTRACE (1-844-598-7223) to offer information and resources to keep them and others safe. Read more here
      • ​On June 10, announced churches, synagogues, mosques and other houses of worship can begin hosting congregants at 50% of their pre-pandemic capacities. Read the guidelines here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On June 15, updated the Specimen Submission and Collection Guidelines. See the updated guidelines here
      • On June 12, announced the beginning of Stage 4 of reopening Indiana. Stage 4 will span June 12-July 3. Read the Executive Order here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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June 11, 2020

This is our thirteenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 4, 2020

This is our twelfth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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May 28, 2020

This is our eleventh weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of May 26, 15,183,888 total viral tests have been reported and 1,858,968 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 12% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you are currently infected. These differ from antibody blood tests; antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus.
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On May 22, announced a new absentee ballot portal that is live online here. Voters in every county of the commonwealth can request a mail-in ballot for the June primary elections. The last day to apply for a ballot is June 15. The primary elections in Kentucky will be held on June 23.
      • On May 22, lifted the interstate travel ban. See the executive order here in English or here in Spanish. 
      • On May 21, provided an updated Healthy at Work schedule for June. See the full schedule here
      • On May 20, announced a $300 million award to city and county governments as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The CARES Act established the Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) to reimburse local governments for expenses incurred in response to the public health emergency caused by COVID-19. Read more here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On May 21, announced that Stage 3 of Indiana’s opening would begin on May 22 for most of the state; Cass, Lake, and Marion counties, the hardest hit areas of the state, will enter Stage 3 later on June 1. Read more about Stage 3 here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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May 21, 2020

This is our tenth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of May 19, 12,601,143 total viral tests have been reported and 1,699,375 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. This is a 13% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you currently are infected. 
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On May 19, announced that museums, outdoor attractions, aquariums, libraries and distilleries will be allowed to reopen with proper distancing and sanitization procedures in place starting June 8.
      • On May 18, announced the appointment of Mark Carter as executive adviser leading the contact tracing efforts in the Office of the Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS). Learn more about contact tracing in a video here
      • On May 14, announced that groups of 10 or fewer may gather again starting May 22 and the travel ban will expire on May 22. Read more here
      • On May 13, announced the next step for health care reopening. Hospitals and care facilities can begin non-emergency surgeries and procedures at 50% of their pre-COVID-19-era patient volume beginning May 13. Facilities will determine their patient capacities starting May 27 as long as progress continues.​
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. Here are some highlights from the past week:
      • On May 18, issued COVID-19 Specimen Collection and Submission Guidelines for healthcare providers. Learn more here
      • See documentation on Indiana’s 5 phases of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

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May 14, 2020

This is our ninth weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Testing
    • As of May 13, 10,217,573 total viral tests have been reported and 1,510,924 positive viral tests have been reported in the United States. That is a 15% positive rate. 
      • Viral tests tell you if you currently are infected. 
      • A single infected person may be tested multiple times, so the number of positive cases is not equal to the number of positive tests. 
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. Here are a few highlights from the past week (see the full list here):
      • On May 7, announced that phase 2 of reopening the economy would start on May 22. Read more here
        • Phase 3 is planned to start on July 1. New Phase 2 reopening dates are now tentatively:
          • May 22 – Restaurants, with limited 33% capacity and outdoor seating
          • June 1 – Movie theaters, fitness centers
          • June 11 – Campgrounds, public and private
          • June 15 – Child care, with reduced capacity; and potentially low-touch and outdoor youth sports
      • On May 6, announced the beginning of Health Care reopening phase 2. This includes outpatient and ambulatory surgery and invasive procedures may resume. Read more here
      • On May 5, announced an aggressive testing plan for long-care facility staff and patients.