Peptic Ulcer Disease: What You Need To Know

Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) occurs when a person has chronic peptic ulcers. Peptic ulcers are sores in the stomach or duodenum lining that develop when stomach acid deteriorates the lining. There are several treatment options available for PUD based on the cause of the disease in a particular person. 

Here’s what you need to know about Peptic Ulcer Disease. 

Causes and Risk Factors 

PUD is usually caused by one of two things. First, a bacterial infection from a bacteria called H. pylori can lead to inflammation in stomach lining and eventually cause ulcers. H. pylori can be transmitted from human-to-human contact, food, or water. Second, the long-term use of anti-inflammatory medications including ibuprofen and aspirin can lead to PUD because these medications can inflame the stomach lining. 

Risk factors associated with Peptic Ulcer Disease include smoking, which can increase risk of ulcers for people infected with H. pylori, and drinking, which can wear away mucus in the stomach lining and increase stomach acid production. 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of Peptic Ulcer Disease include burning stomach pain, nausea, heartburn, bloating, and fatty food intolerance. Burning stomach pain is the most common symptom, and having an empty stomach typically increases pain. While pain may be relieved by eating foods that help buffer stomach acid or taking anti-acid medication, it usually comes back between meals and at night. Notably, while spicy foods and stress may worsen symptoms, they do not cause ulcers. More severe symptoms can include vomiting blood, blood in stool, feeling faint, and trouble breathing. People with severe symptoms should seek medical attention. 

Diagnosis

Doctors diagnose PUD through a combination of a person’s medical history, symptoms, medication history, and tests. One test, an endoscopy, uses a hollow tube with an attached lens to view the throat, stomach, and small intestine to visually detect ulcers. Additionally, doctors often perform a test by blood sample, stool sample, or breath test to determine if H. pylori is present. A tissue sample from an endoscopy may also be used in this case. If an ulcer is found during an endoscopy, doctors may take a tissue sample for a biopsy. Lastly, an x-ray is sometimes used for diagnosis- patients drink barium prior to an x-ray to allow doctors to see internal organ detail. 

Treatment 

Treatments for PUD vary. For ulcers caused by H. pylori, antibiotics can help kill the bacterium through two weeks of treatment. Thereafter, antacid medication may be used to control stomach acid for the patient. Another treatment utilizes proton pump inhibitors, medications that reduce stomach acid by blocking cell production of acid. Another medication group used for treatment is H2 blockers, which reduce stomach acid along with reducing pain and helping healing. Lastly, antacids, medications that neutralize stomach acid, may be used to help relieve symptoms. 

Lifestyle changes are also an important part of treating Peptic Ulcer Disease. Avoiding smoking and alcohol can help reduce risk factors that lead to and worsen PUD. Managing stress can help too- relaxation and exercise can help lower stomach acid production. Lastly, changing diet can help treat PUD too. Unhealthy choices like junk food, fried food, and processed foods make it harder to heal, while whole grains, fresh produce, and fresh fruit may promote healing. 

Our experienced team at GHP can help you get the treatment you deserve for PUD. We can help you establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

5 Things to Know About Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation in the digestive tract. When someone has UC, ulcers form where inflammation has injured cells lining the colon and these ulcers eventually may bleed and create pus. This can lead to the colon needing to be emptied frequently. 

While there is no cure, healthcare professionals can help patients with Ulcerative Colitis pursue proven treatment options for managing their symptoms, and researchers continue to study the disease. Here are 5 things to know about Ulcerative Colitis. 

Causes and Risk Factors

Medical understanding of the cause of Ulcerative Colitis is limited. There are two primary causes of UC that researchers are working to understand. 

First, it could be related to your immune system. A virus or bacterium might trigger UC because of inflammation from an immune response. Some developing research may support this theory. In a recent study, Stanford researchers found that a group of patients with Ulcerative Colitis had a depleted amount of a specific family of bacteria that produces anti-inflammatory substances. 

A second possible cause of Ulcerative Colitis is related to hereditary factors. There is evidence that UC is more common in people with family histories of the disease, so family history is considered a risk factor. However, most people with the disease do not have a family history, so it is not considered a proven cause of UC. 

Types

There are several types of Ulcerative Colitis, each of which is classified by location in the digestive tract. Ulcerative Proctitis is a classification for UC where inflammation is confined to the rectum. Proctosigmoiditis is a type where inflammation occurs in the rectum and lower end of the colon. Left-sided Colitis is when inflammation extends further into the descending colon. Pancolitis is a classification for inflammation that goes beyond just the descending colon and often affects the entire colon. Lastly, Fulminant Colitis is an acute life-threatening form of UC that affects the entire colon.

Symptoms 

Symptoms of Ulcerative Colitis can vary by type and degree of the disease. Loose and urgent bowel movements, bloody stool, abdominal pain and cramps, and persistent diarrhea are common symptoms. Outside of the intestine, symptoms may include fever, nausea, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Often times, symptoms will not be constant. Flare-ups are a common occurrence for people with UC, as are remission periods without symptoms.

Diagnosis

Patients are advised to see a medical professional if they are experiencing persistent changes in their bowel habits or other Ulcerative Colitis symptoms. When a patient is tested for UC, there are several possible approaches. Blood tests, barium enemas, CT scans, colonoscopies, and flexible sigmoidoscopies can all be used to diagnose UC. 

Treatment

Treatment for UC is focused on managing symptoms, as there is no known cure. A combination of medications and lifestyle changes is often helpful, including anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, corticosteriods, avoiding gassy foods, managing stress, and staying hydrated. If these measures do not relieve symptoms, surgery may be recommended by a doctor. Surgery typically means removing the entire colon and rectum. 

Ulcerative Colitis can often be effectively managed with professional guidance and care. GHP is dedicated to helping patients with UC manage their symptoms and live healthy, happy, and full lives. Contact any of our office locations learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

October’s MD Update: Dr. Jones Speaks “Going on Offense Against Cancer”

Our very own Dr. Whitney Jones graced the cover of MD-Update’s October issue.  Read about how he embraces preventative measures to beat colon cancer before it starts in the following article.

“We spend a lot of money on healthcare and health insurance. The problem is, we’re not spending enough on prevention.”— Whitney Jones, MD

 In the movie “Karate Kid,” there’s a scene where Mr. Miyagi asks the title character if he’s training to fight. In his light bulb moment, the student responds that he trains, “So I won’t have to fight.”

Make no mistake, Whitney Jones, MD, knows how to treat cancer. He’s trained for it and has years of experience in it. But it’s a fight he would prefer doesn’t take place.

“We’re going on offense against cancer,” says Jones, a gastroenterologist at Gastroenterology Health Partners (GHP) in Louisville. “We are working on becoming the number one state and the first in the nation to develop programs where we can use genetic testing. We spend a lot of money on healthcare and health insurance. The problem is, we’re not spending enough on prevention. The cost of cancer treatments totally overwhelms the cost of prevention.”

That has been the central message and purpose of the Kentucky Colon Cancer Prevention Project, which Jones helped found in 2004. The project’s work includes education, advocacy, survivor support, and health system change.

“It put the work of the state in front of the legislature,” Jones says, noting that a diverse group of leaders from across the state formed the project’s advisory committee. “It added a mix of healthcare, politics, and business that was catalytic.”

The project has received state funding as well as additional funding from the Kentucky Cancer Foundation, which Jones also helped found in 2012. “We have helped pay for a lot of uninsured people to get colorectal cancer screening,” Jones says.

The impact of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project is reflected in the state’s improvement versus the rest of the country. Jones notes that Kentucky ranked 49th out of 50 in the nation in colon cancer prevention statistics when the project was launched. The state also had the highest rates of incidence and mortality in the nation. Earlier this year, Kentucky ranked 17th best in the nation in the same colon cancer related categories and earned an American Cancer Society Achievement Award for the most improved state in the nation for colorectal screening over the past 15 years.

“When we started our work at the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, there was a huge gap between what could be done and what we were doing,” Jones says. “It’s been a broad coalition, including many of our state leaders and city officials. I think it’s proven that Kentucky can address its own problems, we can develop solutions, we can implement them locally, and we can save lives and save money.”

Read the full article here:

2019 Kicking Butt 5K Event Saves Lives

Kicking Butt 5k at the waterfront Dr. Whitney Jones at the 2019 Kicking Butt 5K

Thank you to everyone who came out and participated in this year’s Kicking Butt 5K! Survivors, fighters, advocates, healthcare providers and community partners all came together on what turned out to be a beautiful Saturday to help raise awareness of colon cancer. Gastroenterology Health Partners was proud to be one of the many sponsors who made this event possible. The Waterfront Park and Big Four Bridge were gracious hosts!

2019 Kicking Butt 5K booths Gastro Health Partners at the 2019 Kicking Butt 5k

The Kicking Butt 5k is an annual race put on courtesy of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project. Our very own physician Dr. Whitney Jones founded the Colon Cancer Prevention Project in 2004.  All of the funds raised as a result of the event go towards supporting their mission of eliminating preventable colon cancer death and suffering. The Project’s resources span from education and advocacy, to health systems improvement and survivor support. While colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, many don’t understand how preventable it is. A donation of $50 can help reach over 100 people who may need to be screened for colon cancer.

5K at the big four bridge 5k at the Louisville Waterfront Park

While the 5k is over, donations can still be made online. For more information on when you or a loved one should start the screening process, schedule an appointment with us online. We have a clinical team of 21 fellowship-trained Gastroenterologists and 13 advanced practice clinicians. All of which conveniently serve the Louisville, Lexington, Kentucky and Southern Indiana communities.

 

2019 Kicking Butt 5K

Join us Saturday, August 24th at at the beautiful Big Four Bridge on Waterfront Park in Louisville, Kentucky for the 2019 Kicking Butt 5k!

This annual family friendly event is put on by the Colon Cancer Prevention Project whose mission it is to eliminate preventable colon cancer death and suffering. Participants are encouraged to spend the morning walking, strolling, running, and rolling to a world without colon cancer! Whether you’re a survivor, fighter, advocate, healthcare provider or community partner, all are welcome!

You can donate to the cause or register for the event online. The race starts at 8:30am with day of registration beginning at 7:30am.

Kicking Butt 5k

About the Colon Cancer Prevention Project

Our very own Dr. Whitney Jones founded the Colon Cancer Prevention Project in 2004. Since then, colon cancer is down more than 25% in the state of Kentucky. The project works to bring awareness to what is a highly preventable disease as well as offer support to those fighting it.

While colon cancer is the 2nd leading cause of all cancer deaths in the United States, when it is detected early, colon cancer is up to 90% curable. According to the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, “It is estimated that 6 out of 10 (60%) deaths from colon cancer could be prevented if everyone were screened at 50.” However, even young people are at risk for developing the disease. 1 in every 10 patients diagnosed are under the age of 50.

How to Take Action

Prevent colon cancer by talking to your doctor about the right time to get screened. It is recommended that men and women of average risk should start screenings by age 50. However, those with a family history or symptoms may need to be screened sooner. Don’t be afraid to ask your family if they’ve been screened as doing so could save their life.

The Gastroenterology Health Partners proudly sponsors the 2019 Kicking Butt 5k. Get screened and schedule an appointment by contacting us today!

Gastro Health Partners’ Doctors Recognized as Louisville’s Top Docs for 2019

Louisville Magazine has just released their annual list of Louisville’s Top Docs for 2019. This year the doctors themselves cast their votes and four physicians from Gastro Health Partners were recognized in the category of gastroenterology.

When asked, “If you or a member of your family were in need of medical care or treatment, who among Louisville-area doctors would you choose to provide medical care in the following specialties?” our peers in the Greater Louisville Medical Society nominated (from left to right) Whitney F. Jones, M.D., Paul Eugene Brown, M.D., Alan J. Cox, M.D., and John C. Horlander, M.D.

                 

Dr. Whitney Jones joined Gastroenterology Health partners in 2017. He is the founder of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project and considered a national expert in the field of gastroenterology.

Dr. Paul Brown has been a member of the Louisville Gastroenterology Associates for 29 years and is Board Certified in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology.

Dr. Alan Cox is the author of several publications pertaining to the study of Gastroenterology. He is also Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology.

Dr. John Horlander is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is actively involved in many research studies pertaining to gastroenterology.

On behalf of our team of 21 fellowship-trained Gastroenterologists and 13 advanced practice clinicians, we are proud to have been featured in this year’s issue of Louisville’s Top Docs among many other admiral physicians from the great city of Louisville. As the region’s leader in GI care, it is our mission to continue to offer cost-effective and comprehensive treatment options to those in Louisville, Lexington, Southern Indiana as well as the surrounding communities. Get screened by the best by scheduling your appointment online today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Sunana Sohi on Following Her Gut

Dr. Sunana Sohi was recently featured in an MD-Update Magazine article highlighting her passion for helping others.

Dr. Sohi has been practicing at Louisville Gastroenterology Associates since 2010 where she treats conditions ranging from IBS and heartburn, to incontinence, hemorrhoids, liver issues and inflammatory bowel disease.

Although Dr. Sohi once studied to become a psychiatrist, she ultimately fell in love with internal medicine. “Gastroenterology is fascinating. It affects people on a quality of life level in a way you wouldn’t necessarily think of,” says Dr. Sohi. 

While Dr. Sohi treats patients of all ages (18 years old to 90 plus) she has noticed a bigger percentage of female patients. This is because, while diet and stress commonly affect the gastroinestinal tracts, hormones in the female body can as well. For example, studies show primarily women are affected with IBS and it is normal for a change in the bowel during premenstrual and menstrual periods. “There’s also a whole slew of GI issues that can come up during pregnancy.” says Dr. Sohi.

Solutions for Everyone

Of all the complaints Dr. Sohi hears, bloating is a reoccurring one. However, according to Dr. Sohi, bloating can be attributed to any number of causes. Often she must explore further to find the root cause and appropriate treatment.

Through diagnostic testing and evaluation, Dr. Sunana Sohi works to find a multitude of solutions for a multitude of patients. Whether the solution lies in adjustments to one’s diet or lifestyle, a probiotic or laxative, or via yoga and meditation, Sohi is a firm believer that there is a solution for everyone. “I try to work with the individual where they are at and what they want to get themselves feeling better.”

If you are experiencing a life impacting GI condition, contact Dr. Sohi or one of the many other Gastroenterology Health Partners today.

Read the full article here:

 

Dr. Emori Carrara On Solving Gastroenterology Enigmas

Dr. Emori Carrara was recently featured in an MD-Update Magazine article where she is credited with treating her patients with both compassion and insight.

Dr. Carrara has been practicing gastroenterology and hepatology at Gastroenterology of Southern Indiana since 2010. As the Kentuckiana area is “one of the nation’s hot spots for obesity related epidemics such as colon cancer and non alcoholic liver disease,” Carrara treats a wide variety of patients and offers endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

Common patient complaints include:

  • Acid Reflux
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Constipation and Diarrhea
  • Celiac Disease
  • Crohn’s/Ulcerative Colitis
  • Hepatitis C
  • Alcoholic Liver Disease
  • Fatty Liver Disease
  • Pancreatic Disease

Dr. Emori Carrara Specializes in Treating Susceptible Female Patients

As most women prefer a female doctor when it comes to these rather sensitive topics, Carrara’s patient base is mostly female. According to MD-Update, “Functional gastrointestinal diseases or conditions in which doctors can’t pinpoint a root cause, even after a thorough evaluation, are more common among women.” For example, a woman’s hormone levels have been known to complicate GI symptoms, and can even cause bowel movement issues. Carrara specifically treats the needs of pregnant women and has seen problems like gallstones and liver issues arise during pregnancy.

GI & The Psyche

When it comes to GI disorders, Carrara believes in taking note of one’s behavioral patterns and considering lifestyle changes before treatment. “Anxiety can contribute to nearly every gastrointestinal symptom and heighten each one,” says Carrara. IBS for example often stems from anxiety or depression. This is why Carrara recommends “stress reduction through exercise or engaging in hobbies as well as a healthy, balanced diet” in addition to medication.

Colon Cancer

In addition to participating in clinical trials and supporting the latest in preventive care, Carrara sees preventing colon cancer as one of the most important things she does as a gastroenterologist. “Colon cancer can be prevented with a colonsocopy as we are able to remove polyps before they can develop into colon cancer,” says Carrara.

To talk to your doctor about screening, contact us today.

Read the full article here:

Dr. John Horlander Explains a Colonoscopy

A Gastro Health Partner physician, Dr. John Horlander is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He has authored various articles relating to gastroenterology and has been involved in research pertaining to the study of gastroenterology.

In this episode of WHAS’s Great Day Live, Dr. Horlander sits down with Rachel Platt and Terry Meiners to explain the ins and outs of a colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer both in Kentucky and the United States.  A colonoscopy can help screen for both colorectal and colon cancer by detecting and removing polyps. Polyps are abnormal growths within the colon lining. While it can take years for polyps to become cancerous, having them preemptively removed is a good preventative measure.

A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure that requires a cleansing routine the day prior to the procedure. This cleansing routine in the most important part of the procedure. A colonoscopy usually only takes 20 to 30 minutes from start to finish and no discomfort is felt as patients are sedated. To schedule a colonoscopy, contact the Gastro Health Partners location nearest you today. 

Watch the full episode of Dr. John Horlander on WHAS Great Day Live here: 

Dr. John Horlander received his undergraduate degree at the University of Notre Dame and earned his Medical degree at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed his clinical training at Indiana University Medical Center where he completed an Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine followed by a dual Fellowship in Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Dr. William Evans Discusses Pancreatitis

Dr. William Evans offers diagnostic and therapeutic care for conditions involving the GI tract, pancreas, and liver.  He provides his patients with comprehensive care that has been honed through years of specialized training and experience.

On this episode of KET’s Kentucky Health, Dr. Evans thoroughly discusses the pancreas as well as pancreatitis.

What is the Pancreas?

The pancreas is an organ that aids in the digestion of food. Located behind the stomach and deep in the abdomen, inflammation of the pancreas can affect all the important organs that surround it and even cause paralysis of the intestines. The two main functions of the pancreas are to regulate blood sugar and to make a enzyme fluid that helps digest any proteins or fats that are consumed. Pancreatitis is a disease that occurs when the pancreas becomes inflamed.

Causes of Pancreatitis 

  • Excessive Alcohol Abuse
  • Certain Medications
  • High Cholesterol
  • Gallstones or Gallbladder Disease (The most common cause.)
  • Virus or Traumatic Injury: (While not very common, viruses or traumatic injuries can result in pediatric cases of pancreatitis.) 
  • Distended Belly or Bloating (Present in more significant cases due to inflammation.)

Symptoms of Pancreatitis 

  • Abdominal Pain (Severe and focused on one’s back, especially triggered when eating.)
  • Nausea or Vomiting

Acute Vs. Chronic Pancreatitis 

Anyone can have acute pancreatitis. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is trapped gallstones blocking the flow of pancreatic juice. In acute pancreatitis, inflammation can be so profound that the organ digests itself. Long term complications include a severe episode where one must be admitted to a hospital and kept for a few days, the death of the pancreas itself, a build up fluid that can become infected, as well as an impact on multiple other organs.

Chronic pancreatitis is most commonly associated with risk factors such as regular alcohol or tobacco use. Chronic pancreatitis can take months to develop and is often asymptomatic. In chronic pancreatitis cases, scar tissue builds up in the pancreas surrounding the nerves and causing pain. Overtime, one can lose function of the gland as well as the ability to digest food, and are at an increased risk for diabetes as well as pancreatic cancer. 

Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States affecting those 45 or older. Signs of pancreatitis cancer include unexplained weight loss, a history of smoking, no obvious cause of pancreatitis, and a family history of the disease.   

Diagnosing & Treating Pancreatitis

Diagnosing pancreatitis often involves a basic exam, medical history, lab work and imaging. A CT scan of the abdomen can show if a stone is causing blockage or if a tumor is present. If a gallstone is a factor, an endoscopy may be required. With little if any food intake, pancreatitis usually takes 3-5  days to resolve, and an additional 6 weeks for the pancreas itself to normalize.

In order to avoid pancreatitis, abstaining from smoking and drinking is recommended. Educating one’s self on gallstones is also a helpful resource in preventative care, as one can have them removed if they become problematic.

Watch the full episode of Dr. William Evans on Kentucky Health here: 


Dr. William Evans earned his Medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies.  He completed his clinical training at the University of Louisville, where he completed an Internship, a Residency in Internal Medicine, and Fellowship in Gastroenterology.  During his fellowship training, Dr. Evans also earned a Masters in Science & Clinical Investigation at the University of Louisville School of Public Health & Information Sciences.  Dr. Evans went on to complete a second Fellowship in Therapeutic Endoscopy at the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville, Florida.