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Importance of Colon Screening in Younger Adults – Dr. Sohi Interviewed

Dr. Sunana Sohi of Gastroenterology Health Partners was recently featured in a WHAS-11 article and video about the increasing rates of colon cancer in younger adults.

The story featured Amanda Blackburn, a 37 year-old mother of two who was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer in 2017. She received a diagnosis after coming to Dr. Sohi with her symptoms of rectal bleeding and a change in bowel habits.

Blackburn had no family history of colon cancer and knew very little about the disease, like many younger adults. “It wasn’t on my radar. The ‘C’ word wasn’t a thing for me,” she said.

Dr. Sohi was able to help Blackburn receive diagnosis and treatment.

“If you have symptoms, don’t wait. There are a lot of tests that can be done, including stool tests, but the number one, the gold standard is colonoscopy. That’s because it’s not only diagnostic but preventative, where we can find and remove small polyps before they become cancer,” Dr. Sohi said.

Read the rest of the Dr. Sohi’s write-up here.

Colon Cancer is not a disease of the elderly anymore; article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The article also discussed the upcoming Kicking Butt 5K Run/Walk, scheduled for Saturday September 25th at the Louisville Waterfront Park. This event, sponsored by the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, was started in 2003 as a way to bring together cancer survivors and advocates, spread awareness, and encourage screenings. It’s not too late to sign up for the 5K, 1 mile, or virtual event, and support this worthy cause.

If you or a loved one are experiencing symptoms of colon cancer or another GI condition, don’t hesitate to contact Dr. Sohi or one of the many experienced physicians at Gastroenterology Health Partners.

As the largest independent gastroenterology practice in the region, GHP is considered the only one of its kind providing results-orientated treatment for a full spectrum of digestive system disorders. Call to set up an appointment at one of our locations in Southern Indiana, Northeast & Central Louisville, and Lexington.

Why You Shouldn’t Wait To Get A Colorectal Cancer Screening

Are you on the fence about getting screened for colorectal cancer? Perhaps you think you’re too young to get cancer, or you don’t have a family history of it, or you’re anxious about the procedure. You push off the appointment, allowing yourself to think, “I’ll do it sometime soon…”

When it comes to colorectal cancer screenings, you shouldn’t ever wait. Regular screenings are recommended for those 45 years and older, and even younger if you have certain risk factors. For example, people with certain inherited conditions are at a higher risk for colon cancer, including those with Lynch syndrome and those with adenomatous polyopsis. You are also at higher risk if you suffer from certain inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s colitis, or ulcerative colitis.

Early detection is the key to effectively dealing with colorectal cancer. When detected early, colorectal cancer has a 95% survival rate. However, that rate drops to 25% if the cancer is not detected and spreads to other organs. 

Screening tests aren’t just used to identify existing cancer. Through screening, your doctor may find and eliminate precancerous polyps (abnormal tissue growths) in the rectum or colon, removing them before they even have the chance of becoming cancerous. Between 25-40% of adults in the United States are estimated to have colorectal polyps.

Colorectal Cancer Increases in Younger Populations 

While the overall occurrence of colorectal cancer has dropped in recent years (largely due to a rise in screenings), its rate among younger populations has actually increased. In fact, according to the American College of Gastroenterology, a millennial now has 2 times the risk of getting colon cancer and 4 times the risk of getting rectal cancer than someone from the baby boom generation. Research shows that rates in adults younger than 50 are continually increasing by 2%, every year. Mortality rates are also increasing.

What is causing this alarming change? Researchers attribute higher colorectal cancer rates in younger adults to a number of factors, including higher rates of obesity, more sedentary lifestyles, poor diet, and other environmental factors. A study released this May found a link between the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and colorectal cancer in women under 50. According to the study, women who drank two or more servings of sugary beverages had twice the risk of developing early-onset colorectal than those who consumed less. Furthermore, adolescents ages 13-18 who consumed sugary sodas had a 32% risk of eventually developing early-onset colorectal cancer. Research is only beginning to unlock certain lifestyle and dietary factors that play a role in developing colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Cancer and Covid-19

During the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, lockdowns and closings forced many people to cancel or put off every type of screening test. Colorectal screening tests in particular decreased by over 90%. In the following months, the numbers of tests only increased to 50% of what they were before the pandemic began. This drastic decline in testing is associated with troubling data about cancer outcomes. In June 2020, the National Cancer Institute predicted an excess of 10,000 colorectal cancer or breast cancer related deaths in the U.S. over the next 10 years, just because of pandemic-induced delays in testing, diagnoses, and treatments. Remaining up-to-date on testing is more important now than ever. 

If you’re due for a colorectal screening test or appointment, but are concerned about Covid-19 safety, don’t hesitate to book an appointment at Gastroenterology Health Partners. We uphold a number of safety procedures in-office, including mask requirements, cleaning and sanitization practices, disinfecting common spaces, and upholding social distancing when possible. Maintaining your safety is of the highest importance to us, just as is providing you with colorectal screening tests such as colonoscopies, flexible sigmoidoscopies, and more. Give us a call today to schedule your appointment.

Pandemic Alcohol Intake and GI Health

The past year-and-a-half has been incredibly difficult for everyone. From hundreds of millions of deaths to the challenge of lockdowns, social isolation and economic hardship, no one has remained unscathed.

Many people have turned to harmful coping mechanisms to deal with the medical, psychological, and sociological problems brought on by pandemic-related stress. While research is still limited, studies suggest that alcohol consumption has increased greatly. The first week of the pandemic, alcohol sales increased by 54% and online alcohol sales increased by 262%. A cross-sectional survey of American adults published in December 2020 found that 60% of people reported increased drinking. 34% of people engaged in binge-drinking and 7% reported extreme binge-drinking.

The impact of increased alcohol consumption on gastrointestinal health is even more staggering. Studies presented at the 2021 Digestive Disease Week suggest a major surge in inpatient consults for alcohol-related gastrointestinal and liver diseases since the beginning of the pandemic. Waihong Chung, a research fellow for the Division of Gastroenterology at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, conducted extensive research on the subject.

Chung found that during the initial lockdown phase of the pandemic, the number of in-person gastrointestinal appointments decreased by 27% (due to restrictions/closings). However, of those appointments, the proportion of consults for alcohol-related GI and liver diseases, such as hepatitis, pancreatitis, gastritis and cirrhosis increased by 59.6%! And, as lockdowns lifted, that percentage increased to 78.7%. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic hepatitis increased by 127.2% (since 2019) and the number of inpatient endoscopic procedures almost tripled.

Chung also contested that the occurrence of alcohol-related diseases could be much higher than reported, since many illnesses take time to manifest or show mild symptoms. Even if you seem to experience no ill-effects from binge-drinking, you should be aware that excessive alcohol is wreaking havoc on your gastrointestinal system. In the short-term, excessive alcohol causes intestinal inflammation and organ damage, alters intestinal microbiota, harms intestinal immunity and homeostasis, and damages the liver. In the long-term, you can suffer from alcohol-related gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

Unfortunately, the long-term effects of Covid-19 on alcohol misuse and overconsumption still have yet to be realized. For example, following the 2003 SARS epidemic, individuals in China who had been directly affected/involved were far more likely to abuse alcohol three years after the epidemic ended. The lasting psychological effects of the pandemic will likely increase alcohol misuse for years to come.

Besides causing fatal gastrointestinal conditions, alcohol can worsen existing mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression. If you or a loved one has been struggling to maintain a healthy relationship with alcohol during the pandemic, it’s recommended that you talk to your primary care doctor or seek medical help. There are behavioral, medical, and mutual-support-based treatment options available for you.

If you are struggling with gastrointestinal issues, induced by alcohol or by something else, seek experienced medical attention. The professional team of medical providers at Gastro Health Partners serves patients across the state of Kentucky and Southern Indiana. Contact a location near you today for more information, or to schedule an appointment.

Colonic Ischemia: What You Need to Know

Colonic ischemia is a condition where blood flow in the colon is reduced. It can cause damage to the affected area of the colon. Here’s everything you need to know about this condition. 

Causes and Risk Factors

Colonic ischemia, as noted above, causes diminished blood flow in the colon. This can be caused by a number of things. Your risk increases if you have fatty buildups on an artery wall (atherosclerosis), extremely low blood pressure (often due to trauma, shock, surgery, or heart failure), or use cocaine or methamphetamine. Some disorders like lupus and sickle cell anemia can also be a cause of this condition. 

Colonic ischemia is more common in adults over 60 and in women. If you have had abdominal surgery, scar tissue from the procedure can also reduce blood flow in some cases. Additionally, people with IBS are more likely to develop colonic ischemia. 

Symptoms of Colonic Ischemia

Some of the most typical symptoms involved with this condition include abdominal pain or tenderness. This can be severe in some cases, and may also build gradually or occur suddenly. You can experience symptoms on the right or left side of your abdomen. Other symptoms also include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, blood in your stool, and a feeling of urgency to defecate. 

Diagnosis

This condition is difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are also associated with a number of other disorders. Doctors diagnose colonic ischemia with a combination of medical history, a physical exam, and some testing procedures. They often start by charting your symptoms and identifying any potential risk factors. Your doctor may also check your abdominal area to identify the location of any pain. They may choose to order a CT scan to help visualize your colon and identify the cause of the symptoms. They may also perform a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy to see detailed images of your colon and potentially take a tissue biopsy. All of these tests are ways they can get at the underlying cause of your symptoms.  

Treating Colonic Ischemia

Doctors treat this condition by helping proper blood flow return to the colon. In milder cases, this may just involve an IV to help you rehydrate. Your doctor may also prescribe antibiotics to prevent infections, and may suggest you avoid medications that constrict your blood vessels. If there is a specific underlying disorder that has caused colonic ischemia (like an irregular heartbeat), your treatment will involve treating that disorder. 

In some cases, you may also need surgery to heal. This is for severe cases where your colon has undergone significant damage. Depending on your situation, doctors may repair any holes in your colon, remove dead tissue, or remove a portion of your colon. 

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience treating patients with conditions including colonic ischemia. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Fecal Transplant: What You Need to Know

A fecal transplant is a procedure in which stool from a healthy donor is transferred to your GI tract. Here’s an overview of the procedure and what you can expect. 

What is a Fecal Transplant? 

Fecal transplants are used to help treat a bacterial infection condition called C. difficile colitis. This condition involves inflammation in the colon as a result of the C. difficile bacteria being present. It can cause diarrhea, fever, and pain, and can be severe if untreated. In some cases, this condition is a complication of antibiotic treatment- antibiotics may have killed off too many good bacteria in your GI system. It can also be caused by ingestion of the C. difficile bacteria itself. In any case, a fecal transplant can help. Doctors often first attempt to treat C. difficile colitis with antibiotics, but if the condition recurs they may shift to a fecal transplant. 

Before the Procedure

Leading up to a transplant, you will have to meet with your doctor to confirm that it’s the best option. You will need a stool donor as well. In some cases, you may be tasked with finding your own potential donor. There are also organizations that gather qualified donor samples for use. 

Doctors evaluate stool donors through a rigorous screening process. Many factors can disqualify potential donors, including recent antibiotic exposure, a recent tattoo or piercing, a history of drug use, a chronic GI disorder, or a history of high-risk sexual behavior. When a donor is a potential match, doctors will also screen them for infectious pathogens. They perform blood and stool tests to look for things like Hepatitis, HIV, parasites, and multi-drug-resistant organisms.

In the days leading up to the actual procedure, you’ll need to follow a few guidelines as well. You should not take any antibiotics in the two days before the transplant. You will have a liquid diet and will need to take a laxative or enema the night before the procedure as well. Follow your doctor’s specific instructions for the best outcomes. 

During the Fecal Transplant

You will need someone to accompany you on the day of the procedure, as you will be undergoing anaesthetic. Doctors use a colonoscopy as the method to transplant the stool. As such, normal colonoscopy procedures are followed (you can read more here). You’ll be under anaesthesia as doctors use an endoscope to enter your GI tract and perform the transplant. The donor stool is deposited in your colon during this process. This healthy donor stool is then able to help replenish the balance of bacteria in your gut. 

After the Procedure

Since this procedure involves a colonoscopy, you’ll have to recover from sedation immediately after the transplant. It can take around an hour to recover. Once recovered, your doctor will discuss how the procedure went with you. Sedative effects can linger for about a day, so you should avoid making important decisions or operating machinery for 24 hours afterwards. Make sure the person who brought you to the doctor’s office also takes you home, as you should not drive. 

This procedure is highly effective at preventing a recurrence of C. difficile. A number of studies have shown around a 90% rate of success. This is a largely effective treatment option to solve issues with C. difficile colitis long-term. 

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience treating patients with conditions like C. difficile colitis. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

 

Colon Cancer Stories

Colon cancer touches many lives each year. It can be powerful to learn how other people have experienced screenings, a diagnosis, and fighting the disease. To wrap up our blog posts on colon cancer for this awareness month, we’re going to showcase a few stories from several sources today.

Colon Cancer Foundation: Jamie’s Story

The Colon Cancer Foundation (CCF) has compiled a number of patient stories about colon cancer. One story features Jamie Crespo, who had both parents diagnosed with colon cancer in the same year (2017). Jamie details how the diagnoses came as a surprise due to a lack of immediate family history of the disease, and how it changed everyone’s lives. She also talks about her parents’ recovery, what she’s learned, and how she has made lifestyle changes following the experience. Read Jamie’s story and others on the CCF’s website.

Colon Cancer Coalition: Melissa’s Story

The Colon Cancer Coalition (CCC) also has a huge number of patient stories you can peruse. One is from Melissa Marshall, who was got colorectal cancer at the age of 51. She had been ignoring symptoms for a while before her diagnosis, including rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fatigue. Melissa eventually met with a colorectal surgeon who performed a colonoscopy and found a tumor in her sphincter. She was diagnosed with Stage III colorectal cancer, and went on to receive chemotherapy and an ostomy bag. Today, Melissa is cancer-free and is a strong advocate. She has also formed a non-profit dedicated to educate people about colorectal cancer. You can read Melissa’s story along with many others here.

Colon Cancer Prevention Project: Lindsay’s Story

The Colon Cancer Prevention Project has featured a striking story from Lindsay Norris, an Oncology nurse who survived Stage III colorectal cancer. She talks about how she never truly understood how her patients felt until she experienced colorectal cancer. In a lengthly blog post, Lindsay goes through all of the elements of her diagnosis and experience receiving treatment, comparing how she viewed these things as a nurse versus how she experienced them personally. It’s a highly insightful read- you can read the post here or visit her website.

Celebrity Colon Cancer Stories: Chadwick Boseman and Will Smith

Colon cancer has affected several well-known celebrities. Just in the past year, Chadwick Boseman passed away with colorectal cancer. The actor, known for films like Black Panther and Thurgood, was only 43. He had been fighting colon cancer for four years. We wrote a blog back in November of 2020 about Chadwick’s life and battle with colon cancer. You can read that post here.

Another story we recently featured is about actor Will Smith. Back in 2019, Will documented the process of his colonoscopy screening. In a vlog posted to his YouTube channel, he shows conversations with his doctor, the prep process, the day of the screening, and the follow-up. It’s a great video that showcases what the experience of getting a colonoscopy is like, and it also drives home the importance of screenings. Read our blog post on the video here.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

ValueOfColonoscopy.org: ASGE’s Useful Awareness and Screening Tool

There are a lot of great resources if you are interested in learning more about colon cancer and screenings. One of our favorites comes from the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscoy (ASGE). The ASGE has a plethora of resources including videos, a screening tool, and statistics at ValueOfColonoscopy.org. Today on the blog, we’ll take you through some of the useful resources on the website.

Screening Tool: Determining Which Test You Should Get

One question many people have about screenings is which test to get. There are numerous options available. It can be confusing when figuring out which is the best fit. Fortunately, the ASGE created a tool that helps you identify the screening method that’s right for you. In a simple yet informative document, they take you through your options based on your risk level (no personal or family history of colon polyps or cancer, family history, or personal history). This tool shows you how these factors impact when you should be screened, how often, and with which screening method. For example, if you have a family history of colon cancer or polyps, it shows that you should have a screening as early as age 40. It also shows that a colonoscopy is best screening given your family history. It recommends talking with your doctor to establish a plan.

Colonoscopies during the Pandemic

During the pandemic, many people have had valid concerns about the safety of activities like doctor’s visits. This has actually impacted how many colonoscopies doctors have performed, and as a result an increase in the number of missed colorectal cancer diagnoses (read our blog post here to learn more). In a video, the ASGE shows how many steps medical professionals are taking to ensure your safety during screenings. They talk about pre-arrival screenings, in-office distancing and barriers, masking, PPE, testing, staff vaccinations, and more. We highly recommend watching this video to get a clear picture of how safe your screening will be. Plus, read our blog post here about what we have been doing at GHP to keep you safe.

Tips as you Prepare for a Colonoscopy

Another important thing this website covers is common patient FAQs leading up to a colonoscopy. The ASGE has a number of helpful guides and tips for you as you prepare for a screening. For example, they have a webpage dedicated to understanding bowel prep, an aspect of screening that many patients dread. They discuss the importance of bowel prep, what type of prep you may need to pursue, and other helpful tips. They even discuss common side effects, specific steps in prepping, and what to do if you forget to take prep medication. This is a great resource to help you make sure your screening is as effective as possible. The ASGE also has content and FAQs that help you understand colon polyps and colonoscopies.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Colon Cancer Awareness: Our Favorite Online Resources

March is colon cancer awareness month. This disease is preventable with timely and regular screenings. Awareness-raising resources and campaigns are a key part in increasing screening rates, so today on the blog we’ll share some of our favorite online resources on the topic.

CDC Resource Library

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an excellent website full of resources. Among these resources is all of their colon cancer content. They have everything from personal stories to an awareness quiz and posts to share on social media. Here’s a list of some of our favorite resources they offer:

  • Data visualizations tool
    • You can examine colon cancer statistics with tools including an interactive map, tables, and charts.
  • Basic information
    • The CDC provides a central hub for all of the basics about colorectal cancer, including symptoms of the disease, screening information, and questions you can ask your doctor.
  • Screening stories
    • Read stories from people who have gotten screenings and learn about their experiences.

ASGE Colon Cancer Awareness Resources

The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has a number of great resources you can use as a patient and as an advocate. Here are a few highlights from their website:

  • Tool to start dialogue about screening for patients and doctors
    • This document breaks down the different types of screening available, divided by different risk categories.
  • Videos
    • ASGE has a number of videos that cover topics like colonoscopies, myths about colon cancer, and community outreach.
  • Banner and poster
    • The organization provides a banner you can use on your website or email signature, plus a poster you can print and hang up.

ASCRS’ Resources

The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons has several resources on their website that you might find helpful. Here are a few favorites:

  • Media pitch letter
    • ASCRS has a letter that you can modify and send to local news organizations, asking for air time to talk about colon cancer.
  • Online store
    • The organization has an online store where you can purchase brochures in bulk for use in treatment settings.

Colon Cancer Coalition’s Targeted Campaign

The Colon Cancer Coalition has a targeted awareness campaign called #BlueForCRC that you can participate in. Their website has resources for this campaign including:

  • Sample social media posts
  • A training webinar for advocates
  • Informational resources that can be distributed
  • Tips and tricks for successful advocacy using their campaign

ACG’s Website

The American College of Gastroenterology’s website features resources that you can use for awareness-raising. Some of our favorites are:

  • A library of graphics that you can print for patients, hang as posters, and share on social media.
  • A podcast series that addresses colon cancer topics in a Q&A format. Episodes cover topics including risk factors, screenings, bowel prep, and early detection.

Our team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for you. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and book an appointment today.

How has the Pandemic Affected Colonoscopies?

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted our lives in countless ways. From finances to health and other aspects of life, it has changed how we live each day. In particular, many common medical check-ups, screenings, and elective procedures have been put on hold or delayed. One of these, the colonoscopy, has seen significantly decreased rates during the pandemic. This is a serious issue, as we know colonoscopies are a key screening strategy to prevent colorectal cancer. On today’s blog, we’ll take a look at how the pandemic has affected colonoscopies.

Colonoscopies During the Pandemic

Early on in the pandemic in 2020, medical practices put many elective and non-essential medical visits and procedures on hold. As a result, screenings for cancer like colonoscopies dropped significantly. One study examining screening rates in the San Francisco area found that colonoscopies decreased about 90% from February to May 2020. This coincided with an 85% decrease in fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), another screening method in the same time frame. There was also a 70% decrease in all in-person appointments, and a 60% increase in telehealth visits. Another report estimated that if that trend continued through early June 2020, there could be around 19,000 missed colorectal cancer diagnoses and over 4,000 additional colorectal cancer deaths across the United States.

These are significant impacts, and compound existing inequities in health outcomes. Many groups that have an increased risk of colorectal cancer have also experienced a higher risk of death from the coronavirus. These groups include Black, Native American, and Hispanic people.

Clearly, the pandemic has caused cascading public health problems. Fortunately, as we have learned more about the coronavirus, medical practices have been able to respond to transmission threats to practice safely. Masking, social distancing, sanitizing, and now vaccinations for medical staff have helped to create safe spaces for patients to receive medical care.

Importance of Screening for Colorectal Cancer

Screening for colorectal cancer is extremely important. When properly done, it has a high success rate at cancer prevention. With a colonoscopy, doctors can identify and remove precancerous polyps that could otherwise develop into cancer over time. The colonoscopy is the gold standard for screenings. When patients get colonoscopies on a proper schedule, the incidence of colorectal cancer falls by around 90%.

Gastro Health Partners, in line with various other organizations, is now endorsing regular screenings starting at age 45. Previously, 50 was the standard for beginning screenings. By changing this to 45, we can prevent more potential cases of cancer and save lives. If you are close to 45 or older, talk with your doctor about getting screened. They will take your situation into account and may recommend earlier or more frequent screenings depending on factors like family history and personal history of polyps.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Read more about how we perform screenings here. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Colorectal Polyps: What You Need to Know

Colorectal polyps are excess tissue that can form in the lining of the colon or rectum. While most are harmless, some can develop into cancer. Here’s what you need to know about polyps.

Causes, Risk Factors, and Symptoms of Colorectal Polyps

Polyps occur when certain mutations in genes cause uncontrolled cell growth. This continued growth can turn into groups of tissue- polyps- in your large intestine. Some of the risk factors for polyps include family history, being 50 or older, obesity, low exercise levels, and tobacco or alcohol use.

In many cases, polyps may not cause any symptoms at all. You may find you have a polyp only after an examination like a colonoscopy. However, in some cases polyps do cause symptoms. These include rectal bleeding, pain, changes in bowel habits, and a change in stool color (red streaks or black stool).

Neoplastic Polyps

One of the two main kinds of polyps is neoplastic. Neoplastic polyps have the potential to become cancerous. Within this classification, there are a few additional types of polyps. Adenomas are the most common type of polyp, making up around 70% of polyps. When found, it’s tested for cancer. It can take many years for these kinds of polyps to become cancerous, so with proper screenings they can be taken care of before they become a major problem. Serrated polyps are the second main type of neoplastic polyps. These can become cancerous depending on their location and size. Larger polyps have a higher risk of becoming cancerous.

Non-neoplastic Polyps

In comparison, non-neoplastic polyps usually do not turn cancerous. One common kind, hyperplastic polyps, are small and very rarely become cancerous. Another type, inflammatory polyps, are common in people with inflammatory bowel disease. These do not grow like other polyps- they develop in response to chronic inflammation. They tend to be benign. One final type is hamartomatous polyps. These may occur as part of a genetic syndrome, and tend to be benign as well.

Reducing Risk and Preventing Colorectal Cancer

In general, there are several lifestyle and screening measures you should take to reduce the risk of polyps and colorectal cancer. Eating fruits and vegetables and reducing fat intake are key dietary steps that can help you remain healthy. In addition, you should limit alcohol and tobacco consumption. Plus, staying active is a must.

You should also consider your risk for colorectal cancer or polyps based on family history. In some cases, you may want to pursue genetic counseling if your family has a history of colon polyps. Additionally, if you have a hereditary disorder that causes polyps, you may need earlier and more regular screenings.

Screenings themselves are a key aspect of preventing colorectal cancer. The colonoscopy remains the gold standard for screenings. It allows doctors to both detect and remove polyps to prevent colorectal cancer. In fact, annual colonoscopies reduce cancer incidence by around 89%. Screenings are now recommended earlier- at GHP we endorse annual colonoscopies for all patients ages 45-75. Visit our website to learn more.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience screening for and treating colorectal cancer. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.