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Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” Walk Great Success!

Gastroenterology Health Partners’ first Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” walk on Saturday, June 1st, 2019 was a great success and a lot of fun, as well!

Gastroenterology Health Partners sponsored the walk, alongside Takeda and University of Kentucky Healthcare. GHP also participated as a team under the name “Strollin’ for the Colon.” As a team, Gastroenterology Health Partners raised $693.00 for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis.

The walk team, “Strollin’ for the Colon”, included employees from Gastroenterology Health Partners:

  • Susan Becht
  • Kayla Kilburn
  • Shetwana Martin
  • Melissa Rainer
  • Deb Walker
  • Laura Yates
  • Rhonda Dase
  • Suzanne Mauck
  • Laura Sprinkle

The last three Gastroenterology Health Partners’ employees each raised over $100.00 for the cause.

The “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk” is a nation-wide walking event that is put on by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to give support and offer resources to those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

The $693.00 raised by Gastroenterology Health Partners, plus additional funds raised by other participating teams, will go to helping fund patient services, education, advocacy, and research to improve the quality of life for those with IBD.

 

 

When It Comes To Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer, More Awareness Is Needed

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in a Cure article about the lack of awareness among providers and patients of early-onset colorectal cancer.

Early-onset colorectal cancer affects those younger than 50 years of age. While many don’t think about getting screened for colon cancer until the age of 50, the rates of colorectal cancer in young and middle-aged adults have increased and are predicted to continue to increase. This is due to many factors, including unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, one’s family history and a lack of awareness.

While colorectal cancer is known as a silent and even painless killer, symptoms can include:

  • Blood present in the stool
  • Change in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or consistency)
  • Loss of weight
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fatigue

If you have a family history of cancer or polyps, it is urged that you speak to a health care professional about getting screened early. Lifestyle factors that can lead to colorectal cancer include obesity, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise, as well as a diet high in red processed meat and low in fresh fruits or vegetables.

According to Dr. Jones, those with a higher sense of awareness tend to be diagnosed at an earlier stage when the cancer is more treatable. Conversely, studies have shown that those with stage 3 and 4 colorectal cancers are among patients that experienced a prolonged diagnostic delay. Therefore, it is recommended that one seek medical help for symptoms right away. While one often delays speaking to a doctor due to embarrassment, this time period is even more prolonged when one factors in the time gap of seeing a primary care physician and then a specialist. “Unless you are aware, you can’t link that to an action, such as being screened, preventing early, behavioral changes,” Jones explained.

Read the full article here: