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National Clinical Alert Issued on Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in an Oncology Nursing News article about how to educate the public about early age onset colorectal cancer.

The article makes note of a national clinical alert co-authored by Dr. Jones urging healthcare providers to get creative about sharing the signs, symptoms and statistics associated with early age onset colorectal cancer.

The national clinical alert is not intended to be limited to just those in the field of gastroenterology. OB-GYNs, as well as those in surgical specialties, adult and pediatric primary care, family and internal medicine, emergency and urgent care departments, occupational medicine, community health centers, and departments of health and healthcare systems worldwide are encouraged to raise awareness about the growing disease.

According to the Colon Cancer Prevention Project founded by Dr. Jones himself, “10% of people diagnosed with colon cancer are under the age of 50 and that number is rising.” When it comes to early age onset colorectal cancer, one’s family history plays a significant role. While everyone is at risk for developing the disease, those with a family history of it are at an even greater risk.

Being knowledgeable about one’s family health history can help to determine the proper time to start screening. On time screening saves lives by detecting and removing polyps in the colon or rectum before they turn into cancer. A screening can also find colon cancer early on, when it is most treatable. The Colon Cancer Prevention Project states that, “when detected early, colon cancer is up to 90% curable.” As an additional preventive measure, healthcare providers are encouraged by the national clinical alert to start implementing early assessments during physical exams as well as cover the basics of digestive health with their patients. 

Talk to your doctor about the right time to get screened by contacting us today.

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When It Comes To Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer, More Awareness Is Needed

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in a Cure article about the lack of awareness among providers and patients of early-onset colorectal cancer.

Early-onset colorectal cancer affects those younger than 50 years of age. While many don’t think about getting screened for colon cancer until the age of 50, the rates of colorectal cancer in young and middle-aged adults have increased and are predicted to continue to increase. This is due to many factors, including unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, one’s family history and a lack of awareness.

While colorectal cancer is known as a silent and even painless killer, symptoms can include:

  • Blood present in the stool
  • Change in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or consistency)
  • Loss of weight
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fatigue

If you have a family history of cancer or polyps, it is urged that you speak to a health care professional about getting screened early. Lifestyle factors that can lead to colorectal cancer include obesity, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise, as well as a diet high in red processed meat and low in fresh fruits or vegetables.

According to Dr. Jones, those with a higher sense of awareness tend to be diagnosed at an earlier stage when the cancer is more treatable. Conversely, studies have shown that those with stage 3 and 4 colorectal cancers are among patients that experienced a prolonged diagnostic delay. Therefore, it is recommended that one seek medical help for symptoms right away. While one often delays speaking to a doctor due to embarrassment, this time period is even more prolonged when one factors in the time gap of seeing a primary care physician and then a specialist. “Unless you are aware, you can’t link that to an action, such as being screened, preventing early, behavioral changes,” Jones explained.

Read the full article here: