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Dr. Abdul Jabbar on Saving Lives with Colon Screenings

According to Gastro Health Partner physician Dr. Abdul Jabbar, “When you look at a colon cancer map of the USA, you’ll be surprised to see that along the Ohio river, specifically over Clark and Floyd county, there are significantly higher incidences of colon cancer.” This is due in large part to the region’s lifestyle. A lack of exercise, high obesity rates, excessive alcohol consumption, tobacco use and a diet high in processed red meat and low in fibrous fruits and vegetables can lead to colorectal cancer. 

Having recently sat down with Baptist Health Floyd for one of their Health Topics episodes, Dr. Jabbar is quick to point out how colon screenings can save lives. “A colonoscopy is one of the best tools available,” he says. With timely colon screenings, the rate of colorectal cancer mortality in the area has decreased as much as 53%. 

What is a colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is done using a colonoscope which is a flexible tube with a camera attached to it. This allows physicians to look inside the organ without doing any surgery. A colonoscopy is minimally invasive with minimal sedation required, and can be completed within 10 to 30 minutes.

The procedure helps to identify polyps that either are cancerous or could potentially turn cancerous. These polyps are then removed and the patient’s care is expedited. To schedule a colonoscopy, contact the Gastro Health Partners location nearest you today.

Watch the full episode of Dr. Abdul Jabbar on Baptist Health Floyd’s Heath Topics here:

Dr. Abdul Jabbar joined Gastroenterology of Southern Indiana in 2006. He earned his medical degree from Nishtar Medical College in Pakistan. For one year he served as Research Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia before completing his Internal Medicine Internship and Residency at Columbia University teaching program in Summit, New Jersey. He received his dual Fellowship training in Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the University of Louisville, followed by additional training in hepatology and endoscopic ultrasound. Prior to moving to Southern Indiana, Dr. Jabbar served as Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Department of Gastroenterology at the University of Louisville. Dr. Jabbar is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology.

 

National Clinical Alert Issued on Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in an Oncology Nursing News article about how to educate the public about early age onset colorectal cancer.

The article makes note of a national clinical alert co-authored by Dr. Jones urging healthcare providers to get creative about sharing the signs, symptoms and statistics associated with early age onset colorectal cancer.

The national clinical alert is not intended to be limited to just those in the field of gastroenterology. OB-GYNs, as well as those in surgical specialties, adult and pediatric primary care, family and internal medicine, emergency and urgent care departments, occupational medicine, community health centers, and departments of health and healthcare systems worldwide are encouraged to raise awareness about the growing disease.

According to the Colon Cancer Prevention Project founded by Dr. Jones himself, “10% of people diagnosed with colon cancer are under the age of 50 and that number is rising.” When it comes to early age onset colorectal cancer, one’s family history plays a significant role. While everyone is at risk for developing the disease, those with a family history of it are at an even greater risk.

Being knowledgeable about one’s family health history can help to determine the proper time to start screening. On time screening saves lives by detecting and removing polyps in the colon or rectum before they turn into cancer. A screening can also find colon cancer early on, when it is most treatable. The Colon Cancer Prevention Project states that, “when detected early, colon cancer is up to 90% curable.” As an additional preventive measure, healthcare providers are encouraged by the national clinical alert to start implementing early assessments during physical exams as well as cover the basics of digestive health with their patients. 

Talk to your doctor about the right time to get screened by contacting us today.

Read the full article here:

Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” Walk Great Success!

Gastroenterology Health Partners’ first Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” walk on Saturday, June 1st, 2019 was a great success and a lot of fun, as well!

Gastroenterology Health Partners sponsored the walk, alongside Takeda and University of Kentucky Healthcare. GHP also participated as a team under the name “Strollin’ for the Colon.” As a team, Gastroenterology Health Partners raised $693.00 for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis.

The walk team, “Strollin’ for the Colon”, included employees from Gastroenterology Health Partners:

  • Susan Becht
  • Kayla Kilburn
  • Shetwana Martin
  • Melissa Rainer
  • Deb Walker
  • Laura Yates
  • Rhonda Dase
  • Suzanne Mauck
  • Laura Sprinkle

The last three Gastroenterology Health Partners’ employees each raised over $100.00 for the cause.

The “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk” is a nation-wide walking event that is put on by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to give support and offer resources to those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

The $693.00 raised by Gastroenterology Health Partners, plus additional funds raised by other participating teams, will go to helping fund patient services, education, advocacy, and research to improve the quality of life for those with IBD.

 

 

The Colon Cancer Prevention Project

While many know that colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in America, few are aware that it is also one of the most preventable. In an effort to educate the population about colon cancer prevention, our very own gastroenterologist Dr. Whitney Jones founded the Colon Cancer Prevention Project in 2003.

As a state-based advocacy organization, the Colon Cancer Prevention Project leads the nation in information on colon cancer prevention. Since its establishment, the Colon Cancer Prevention Project has helped to double Kentucky’s screening rates. It is also responsible for cutting the state’s colon cancer mortality rates by 28%.

“Although 50 has been tagged as the time to start your screening, it shouldn’t be the first time you hear about colon cancer,” says Dr. Jones. Knowing the facts can help people determine the right time to get screened. Simply having  a conversation with your family about their history of having polyps removed can save your life.

For example, for those of average risk, age 50 is acceptable. However, for those with a family history of polyp removal, screening as early as 10 years before their family member’s diagnosis could be critical in preventing cancer from developing.  

A “previvor” as the project calls it, is someone who was screened on time. As a result, they found precancerous polyps that were removed before they turned into colon cancer. Hear from real life “previvors” on why you should take ownership of your own health in the video below. Talk to your doctor about the right time to get screened by contacting us today. 

Watch & Save a Life:

Dr. Whitney Jones is a practicing Gastroenterologist, former therapeutic endoscopist and Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville from 1994 until 2017. He joined GHP in 2017 cofounding its new east Louisville division, Gastroenterology & Endoscopy Associates, PLLC, alongside Drs. Ashok Kapur and Laszlo Makk.

When It Comes To Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer, More Awareness Is Needed

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in a Cure article about the lack of awareness among providers and patients of early-onset colorectal cancer.

Early-onset colorectal cancer affects those younger than 50 years of age. While many don’t think about getting screened for colon cancer until the age of 50, the rates of colorectal cancer in young and middle-aged adults have increased and are predicted to continue to increase. This is due to many factors, including unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, one’s family history and a lack of awareness.

While colorectal cancer is known as a silent and even painless killer, symptoms can include:

  • Blood present in the stool
  • Change in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or consistency)
  • Loss of weight
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fatigue

If you have a family history of cancer or polyps, it is urged that you speak to a health care professional about getting screened early. Lifestyle factors that can lead to colorectal cancer include obesity, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, lack of exercise, as well as a diet high in red processed meat and low in fresh fruits or vegetables.

According to Dr. Jones, those with a higher sense of awareness tend to be diagnosed at an earlier stage when the cancer is more treatable. Conversely, studies have shown that those with stage 3 and 4 colorectal cancers are among patients that experienced a prolonged diagnostic delay. Therefore, it is recommended that one seek medical help for symptoms right away. While one often delays speaking to a doctor due to embarrassment, this time period is even more prolonged when one factors in the time gap of seeing a primary care physician and then a specialist. “Unless you are aware, you can’t link that to an action, such as being screened, preventing early, behavioral changes,” Jones explained.

Read the full article here:

Dr. John Horlander Explains a Colonoscopy

A Gastro Health Partner physician, Dr. John Horlander is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He has authored various articles relating to gastroenterology and has been involved in research pertaining to the study of gastroenterology.

In this episode of WHAS’s Great Day Live, Dr. Horlander sits down with Rachel Platt and Terry Meiners to explain the ins and outs of a colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer both in Kentucky and the United States.  A colonoscopy can help screen for both colorectal and colon cancer by detecting and removing polyps. Polyps are abnormal growths within the colon lining. While it can take years for polyps to become cancerous, having them preemptively removed is a good preventative measure.

A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure that requires a cleansing routine the day prior to the procedure. This cleansing routine in the most important part of the procedure. A colonoscopy usually only takes 20 to 30 minutes from start to finish and no discomfort is felt as patients are sedated. To schedule a colonoscopy, contact the Gastro Health Partners location nearest you today. 

Watch the full episode of Dr. John Horlander on WHAS Great Day Live here: 

Dr. John Horlander received his undergraduate degree at the University of Notre Dame and earned his Medical degree at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed his clinical training at Indiana University Medical Center where he completed an Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine followed by a dual Fellowship in Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

How Kentucky’s Lifestyle and Genetics Are Contributing To High Colon Cancer Rates

Dr. Whitney Jones was recently featured in a Bowling Green Daily News article about how Kentucky’s lifestyle and genetics are contributing to high colon cancer rates.

The article highlights some alarming statistics. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kentucky has the highest rate of colorectal cancer in the nation, and it is the third leading cause of cancer death in women and men.

Lifestyle Causes of Colorectal Cancer Include

  • Lack of exercise
  • Diet high in processed red meat and low in fruits and vegetables
  • Obesity
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Tobacco use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranks Kentucky as the second highest state in the nation for tobacco use. What’s more, over two-thirds of adults in Kentucky are overweight, less than a tenth eat enough fruits and vegetables, and more than a third do not exercise regularly.

In addition to harmful lifestyle habits, a family history of colorectal cancer puts patients at a higher risk for developing the disease themselves.

Dr. Whitney Jones, a gastroenterologist with Gastroenterology Health Partners in Louisville is a national expert and frequent speaker on early-age onset colorectal cancer prevention, as well as genetic GI cancer syndrome testing, risk management and communication strategies for population-based cancer prevention.

Founder of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, an organization dedicated to colon cancer prevention, Dr. Jones is an advocate for utilizing genetic testing to improve patient outcomes and lower cancer-related societal outcomes. The article notes a bill recently passed by Kentucky legislators that requires health insurance to cover genetic tests for cancer when recommended by licensed medical professionals.

DNA testing can help expose those with genetic risks for colorectal cancer and determine the appropriate age for them to begin screening. In his work, Dr. Jones recognizes a correlation between low screening rates and high incidences of colon cancer and mortality rates. “Only one in 10 people get genetic testing before developing cancer. If you know you were going to have a car wreck next Thursday, what would you do?”

Read the full article here:

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome – Signs and Symptoms

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a gut disorder affecting the large intestine. Though the exact cause is not known, this chronic condition is thought to be the result of hormonal or bacterial changes in the gut, as well as the disruption in communication between one’s gut and brain; as together they are tasked with controlling digestion.

While the syndrome afflicts mostly those under the age of 50, women are twice as likely than men to suffer from IBS. The following are the most common signs and symptoms of IBS, most of which can be relieved with the passing of a bowel movement.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Cramping & Abdominal Pain
  • Bloating & Gas
  • Diarrhea and or Constipation

Pain is usually felt as the muscles in the lower abdomen contract and excessive gas from bacteria can leave the stomach feeling full and protruding.

The three main types of IBS are:

  • Diarrhea-Predominant (D-IBS)
  • Constipation-Predominate (C-IBS)
  • Alternating Constipation and Diarrhea (A-IBS)

Both diarrhea and constipation are key symptoms of IBS. This is because the condition causes the muscles to contract in an abnormal way. As a result, they either speed up or slow down one’s bowel movements. Blood or mucus in the stool is another sign for concern as well.

While there is no cure for IBS, one’s diet, lifestyle and stress levels can play an important role in managing the symptoms.

Diet

Removing specific carbohydrates form one’s diet may help prevent flare ups. Food allergies, a lactose intolerance and celiac disease for example tend to cause inflammation and irritation in the gut.

Lifestyle

Exercise and proper sleep have been effective in stimulating normal contractions in the intestines. Additionally, proper hydration, high fiber foods and natural or probiotic supplements can help regulate bowel movements.

Stress

As the nervous system controls the gut, IBS is also thought to be linked to one’s mental health. Effectively treating anxiety, depression and stress therefore could help reduce psychological events that may be triggering IBS.

As one’s sensitivity varies from person to person, a gastroenterologist can help best identify IBS triggers. A gastroenterologist can also and discuss options for managing symptoms with or without medication. More serious signs of IBS including weight loss, pain that isn’t relieved by gas or a bowel movement, fever, vomiting, and iron deficiency. These symptoms might be indicative of colon cancer. Those with a family history of IBS and or mental health issues are at more of a risk for suffering from the condition. In order to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment regiment, it is recommended that you see a specialist in digestive diseases

If you are experiencing some of the signs and symptoms of IBS contact Gastroenterology Health Partners today. Our clinical team of 21 fellowship-trained Gastroenterologists and 13 advanced practice clinicians have been providing care to patients suffering from disorders of the digestive system since 2013. Each of our five locations in the Louisville, Lexington and Southern Indiana area offer expert specialization in gastrointestinal care. Just visit our website to schedule an appointment at the location most convenient to you.

Dr. William Evans Discusses Pancreatitis

Dr. William Evans offers diagnostic and therapeutic care for conditions involving the GI tract, pancreas, and liver.  He provides his patients with comprehensive care that has been honed through years of specialized training and experience.

On this episode of KET’s Kentucky Health, Dr. Evans thoroughly discusses the pancreas as well as pancreatitis.

What is the Pancreas?

The pancreas is an organ that aids in the digestion of food. Located behind the stomach and deep in the abdomen, inflammation of the pancreas can affect all the important organs that surround it and even cause paralysis of the intestines. The two main functions of the pancreas are to regulate blood sugar and to make a enzyme fluid that helps digest any proteins or fats that are consumed. Pancreatitis is a disease that occurs when the pancreas becomes inflamed.

Causes of Pancreatitis 

  • Excessive Alcohol Abuse
  • Certain Medications
  • High Cholesterol
  • Gallstones or Gallbladder Disease (The most common cause.)
  • Virus or Traumatic Injury: (While not very common, viruses or traumatic injuries can result in pediatric cases of pancreatitis.) 
  • Distended Belly or Bloating (Present in more significant cases due to inflammation.)

Symptoms of Pancreatitis 

  • Abdominal Pain (Severe and focused on one’s back, especially triggered when eating.)
  • Nausea or Vomiting

Acute Vs. Chronic Pancreatitis 

Anyone can have acute pancreatitis. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is trapped gallstones blocking the flow of pancreatic juice. In acute pancreatitis, inflammation can be so profound that the organ digests itself. Long term complications include a severe episode where one must be admitted to a hospital and kept for a few days, the death of the pancreas itself, a build up fluid that can become infected, as well as an impact on multiple other organs.

Chronic pancreatitis is most commonly associated with risk factors such as regular alcohol or tobacco use. Chronic pancreatitis can take months to develop and is often asymptomatic. In chronic pancreatitis cases, scar tissue builds up in the pancreas surrounding the nerves and causing pain. Overtime, one can lose function of the gland as well as the ability to digest food, and are at an increased risk for diabetes as well as pancreatic cancer. 

Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States affecting those 45 or older. Signs of pancreatitis cancer include unexplained weight loss, a history of smoking, no obvious cause of pancreatitis, and a family history of the disease.   

Diagnosing & Treating Pancreatitis

Diagnosing pancreatitis often involves a basic exam, medical history, lab work and imaging. A CT scan of the abdomen can show if a stone is causing blockage or if a tumor is present. If a gallstone is a factor, an endoscopy may be required. With little if any food intake, pancreatitis usually takes 3-5  days to resolve, and an additional 6 weeks for the pancreas itself to normalize.

In order to avoid pancreatitis, abstaining from smoking and drinking is recommended. Educating one’s self on gallstones is also a helpful resource in preventative care, as one can have them removed if they become problematic.

Watch the full episode of Dr. William Evans on Kentucky Health here: 


Dr. William Evans earned his Medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies.  He completed his clinical training at the University of Louisville, where he completed an Internship, a Residency in Internal Medicine, and Fellowship in Gastroenterology.  During his fellowship training, Dr. Evans also earned a Masters in Science & Clinical Investigation at the University of Louisville School of Public Health & Information Sciences.  Dr. Evans went on to complete a second Fellowship in Therapeutic Endoscopy at the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville, Florida.