Posts

Coronavirus Updates

November 23rd, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 132nd weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 228,154,832 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/16/22. This is 68.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,598,169 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/21/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,843,534 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/15/22. This is 55.3% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 18th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 131st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 228,154,832 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/16/22. This is 68.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,597,286 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/14/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,843,534 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/15/22. This is 55.3% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 11th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 130th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 227,802,408 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/09/22. This is 68.6% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,596,390 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 11/07/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,841,919 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/08/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

November 4th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 129th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 227,377,753 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 11/02/22. This is 68.5% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,595,253 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/31/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,840,146 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 11/01/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 25th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 128th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 226,594,560 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/19/22. This is 68.2% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,593,862 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/24/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,836,037 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/18/22. This is 55.2% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 18th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 127th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 226,200,755 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/12/22. This is 68.1% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,592,619 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/17/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,834,506 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/12/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 11th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 126th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 225,870,613 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 10/06/22. This is 68% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,590,358 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/03/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here. (No update)
    • 3,832,168 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 10/04/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

October 4th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 125th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 225,284,115 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/28/22. This is 67.9% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,590,358 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 10/03/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,829,486 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/27/22. This is 55.1% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 27th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 124th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,980,931 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/21/22. This is 67.8% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,579,651 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/26/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,828,893 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/25/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 20th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 123st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,636,858 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/14/22. This is 67.7% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,587,775 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/19/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,826,606 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/18/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

September 13th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 122st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,367,691 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 9/7/22. This is 67.6% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,585,575 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/12/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,824,492 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/11/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

September 7th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 121st weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 224,113,439 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 8/31/22. This is 67.5% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,584,233 individuals in Kentucky are fully vaccinated as of 9/6/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,821,535 individuals in Indiana are fully vaccinated as of 9/1/22. This is 55% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

August 31th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 120th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

  • Confirmed cases and deaths
  • Vaccine progress
    • 223,914,723 people in the United States are fully vaccinated as of 8/24/22. This is 67.4% of the population. See the CDC’s dashboard here
    • 2,581,875 individuals are fully vaccinated in Kentucky as of 8/29/22. This is 58% of the population. Learn more here
    • 3,819,773 individuals are fully vaccinated in Indiana as of 8/28/22. This is 54.9% of the total population. Learn more here
  • Kentucky
    • The state of Kentucky’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Beshear. See the full list here.
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about when you can get a vaccine in Kentucky here
  • Indiana
    • The state of Indiana’s response to COVID-19 includes both guidelines for specific groups and Executive Orders from Governor Holcomb. 
      • The Pfizer vaccine is now available for children ages 5 to 11, after the FDA’s authorization of the vaccine for that age group. 
      • Learn more about vaccine eligibility in Indiana here, including when and where you can get a vaccine. 
      • Read documentation on Indiana’s 5 stages of reopening here
      • A full resource guide for Indiana residents is available here. Recent public updates can be found here
  • Resource List

August 15th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 119th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

July 25th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 118th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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July 19th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 117th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

 

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July 12th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 116th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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July 6th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 115th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 28th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 114th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

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June 20th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 113th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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June 14th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 112th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

Lexington-Fayette Coronavirus Information

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June 9th, 2022

In order to best protect our staff and patients, we are continuing to require that everyone wears a mask in all of our offices. You can read more about our response to COVID-19 on our website.

This is our 111th weekly update regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19). Below, you will find updated facts and figures. 

10 Things You Should Know About Hemochromatosis

Hemochromatosis is a medical condition where an abnormal amount of additional iron builds up in a person’s blood to the point of potentially causing bodily harm and damage to the liver, heart, endocrine glands, joints and more. Research suggests that in the U.S., approximately one out of every 300 non-Hispanic Caucasians suffers from hereditary hemochromatosis, with the majority being of northern European decent. 

The most common cause of hemochromatosis is hereditary and determined by genetics. Classic or hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic condition that often does not appear until people hit middle age. 

Interestingly, hemochromatosis is significantly more common among males, with estimates suggesting that men are affected two to three times more frequently than women.  Additionally, the initial onset of this inherited disease tends to be slightly earlier in men.  This is because women are somewhat “protected” by menstrual blood loss earlier in life.  

For more information about hemochromatosis including important facts you should know, follow along.

10 Things to Know About Hemochromatosis 

  1. While hemochromatosis was initially discovered sometime during the 1800s, by 1935 it was known as an inherited condition resulting from too much iron in the body.
  2. While some people are asymptomatic, common symptoms associated with hemochromatosis include: fatigue, hyperpigmentation of the skin, pain in the joints, stomach pain, weight loss, and decreased libido. 
  3. Serious complications associated with hemochromatosis include diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis of the liver and heart failure.
  4. While most cases of hemochromatosis are caused by hereditary factors, it is also possible to get hemochromatosis from a buildup of iron due to things like blood transfusions used to treat severe cases of anemia.
  5. Hemochromatosis can lead to a variety of liver abnormalities including: hepatomegaly or liver enlargement, liver scarring/cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and liver disease. Additionally, hepatocellular carcinoma, a certain type of liver cancer, is sometimes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis. 
  6. Sometimes hemochromatosis impacts the color of a person’s skin, changing it to more of a bronze or gray coloring.  In the 1800s, it was called “bronze diabetes” and “pigmented cirrhosis.”  
  7. If you suffer from hemochromatosis, one of the most effective ways to lower the amount of iron in your body tends to be regularly scheduled removal of blood. 
  8. People who have family members (especially siblings) that are diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis may want to consider genetic testing.
  9. Hemochromatosis is often initially diagnosed with a blood test. When someone has a high ratio of iron to transferrin in their blood, it may suggest they are suffering from hemochromatosis.  The disease can be confirmed with a blood test to look for the genes causing hemochromatosis.  
  10. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute, HFE, the gene that causes hereditary hemochromatosis, was first identified in 1996 on chromosome 6.

Hemochromatosis is a manageable condition that can be extremely serious if undiagnosed or left untreated. For more information or to arrange diagnostic testing, you should seek out assistance from a qualified medical professional. 

If you or someone you love is suffering from hemochromatosis, the experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you. Our clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system. For more information or to schedule a gastroenterological medical evaluation, contact a Gastro Health Partners location near you.

 

Sudden Difficulty Swallowing? Here’s What It Is, And What Could Be Causing It

Ever experienced pain, discomfort, or difficulty while attempting to swallow? This condition is known as dysphagia. Dysphagia is highly common–around 13.5% of the population experiences it at some time–and it is caused by a variety of different medical conditions and diseases.

There are two main types of dysphagia: oropharyngeal and esophageal.

Oropharyngeal dysphagia is associated with the muscles of the mouth and upper throat. When muscles are weakened due to neurological and nervous system disorders, the act of swallowing may become difficult. This can also feel like a numbness of the throat, resulting in an inability to “feel” food. Multiple sclerosis, a stroke, Parkinson’s, and other brain disorders are associated with oropharyngeal symptoms.

Esophageal dysphagia is usually associated with a physical narrowing of the esophagus or motility issues of the esophagus and upper stomach. Some muscular conditions, such as muscle spasms, throat cancer, or diverticulum, can make it difficult to fully swallow food, resulting in discomfort. Physical blockages related to benign/cancerous growth or strictures may cause esophageal dysphagia.

Esophageal dysphagia is also a frequent symptom of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD), or chronic acid reflux. GERD is a result of dysfunction of the esophageal sphincter, a muscle in the esophagus. Normally, when you swallow, the esophageal sphincter muscle relaxes to allow food and liquid to enter your stomach. In GERD, the muscle relaxes abnormally or weakens, allowing stomach acid to enter the esophagus. This results in chronic discomfort, heartburn, chest pain, regurgitation, nausea, and dysphagia. In the long-term, GERD can lead to scarring and Barrett’s Esophagus, which is an abnormal change in the lining of the esophagus which can increase your risk for esophageal cancer.  

While dysphagia is most common in older populations, it can really happen to anyone. Dysphagia is almost always a symptom of another underlying condition. If you experience severe symptoms of dysphagia, seek immediate medical assistance. 

If you experience dysphagia as a symptom of GERD, consider consulting a gastroenterologist. There are ways you can address symptoms of GERD to reduce severity and chronic symptoms. Some risk factors of GERD include obesity, hiatal hernia, pregnancy, smoking, asthma, diabetes, overeating, and connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma. To learn more about heartburn, acid reflux, and GERD, click here. If you have been diagnosed with GERD and wish to manage symptoms through dietary choices, read our blog here.

If you are suffering from chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, the experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you. Our clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system. For more information or to schedule a gastroenterological medical evaluation, contact a Gastro Health Partners location near you.

 

Unlocking The Gut-Brain Connection | Mental Health Awareness Month 2022

May is #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth, a time to amplify the stories of the millions of Americans experiencing mental health conditions as well as promote valuable resources and information concerning mental health statistics and treatment options. Using the hashtag #TogetherForMH, you can share your story or explore other’s across social media platforms. 

During the pandemic, global prevalence of anxiety and depression has increased by at least 25%, according to the World Health Organization. Nearly 56% of all young adults report symptoms of anxiety and depression. What’s more, negative impacts of pandemic stressors have leached into daily life as well: 36% of adults report difficulty sleeping, 32% report issues with eating, 12% report increases in alcohol consumption and substance abuse, and 12% report worsening of pre-existing chronic conditions.  

In the midst of this unprecedented mental health crisis, finding treatment options that are beneficial and sustainable is of the utmost importance. Of course, seeking help can be difficult. Small steps, such as discussing your symptoms with your doctor, a psychiatrist, or even beginning with a trusted relative or friend, is essential. The National Institute of Mental Health has compiled these valuable resources, such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, the Mental Health Information Glossary, and a Tips for Talking to Your Mental Health Provider Factsheet

What is the Gut-Brain Connection?

As gastroenterologists, we treat a variety of digestive conditions, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Colon and Colorectal Cancer, Heartburn, Acid Reflux, and GERD, Constipation, and much more. 

These digestive conditions may sound completely removed from mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, but they are actually explicitly linked. In recent years, we’ve discovered that there’s a “second brain” in the gut, often referred to as the enteric nervous system (ENS), which directly responds to physicochemical stimuli, produces serotonin and other chemicals that affect how the brain works, and even regulates immune response. This leads to the “gut-brain connection” (GBC), which is the back-and-forth relationship between gut health and brain health. Many functional bowel conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia, and their symptoms, such as bloating, constipation, diarrhea, occur more frequently in people who experience anxiety, depression, and emotional shifts. Essentially, we’ve found that addressing mental health conditions and keeping stress under control can result in relief from certain digestive conditions; while, in turn, treating your digestive conditions and gut health can help improve your mental health.

New research, published in Molecular Psychiatry this month has found links between certain immune abnormalities in the brain and the gut in people with idiopathic autism. Another study found the impacts of gut microbiome diversity and intestinal flora on your food cravings, and another found connections between certain microbial composition and whether or not you’re a “morning person” or “night owl.” Certainly, we are at the forefront of understanding the numerous impacts of the gut-brain connection.

How can you begin to address your gut health?

We’ve written a lot about this! Beyond seeking diagnosis and treatment for specific medical conditions, you can improve the diversity of your gut microbiome through eating specific foods, taking probiotics, exercising, getting more sleep, and finding ways to manage stress. If you’re interested in learning more about the “#guthealth” trend that has taken the internet by storm, read our blog here. If you want to read more about diet, and in particular the importance of fiber, read our blog here

The experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you if you are concerned about your gut health or have other gastroenterological issues. For more information or to schedule an appointment at one of our Kentucky or Southern Indiana offices, contact one of our practice locations near you.  

#GutHealth: Discerning Trend From Reality

“Gut health” seems to be a social media buzzword these days, with TikTok and Instagram influencers pushing products, juices, and bizarre diets to “heal” the gut, i.e., reduce bloating, improve digestion, and act as a sort of “cure all” for many common gastrointestinal symptoms and conditions, such as IBS and IBD. Aloe vera juice, bone broth, apple cider vinegar, probiotic-enriched muffin mixes–With so many emerging and unverified natural and unnatural remedies floating around the internet, it can be overwhelming to discern fact from fiction. 

At the same time, there’s so much new and exciting research around the role of the gut microbiome in overall physical and mental health. Research has found that boosting the diversity of gut microbiota (the vast array of “good” bacteria in your digestive system) can have positive effects on the immune system, improve mental health conditions like depression, improve sleep and heart health, and even reduce the rate of certain types of cancer

That being said, these recent, ungrounded social media trends are nothing but dangerous. 

In a recent New York Times article, University of London senior lecturer Stephanie Alice Baker defined these fads as the latest manifestation of the idea of “self-optimization,” an insidious mechanism to promote diet culture and “ideal” body types through unlikely sources. By labeling weight loss as “gut healing,” influencers are able to promote extreme, unhealthy diets. What’s more, these influencers often have no medical authority and may only be promoting a product because they’re being paid to do so. 

The truth of the matter is: there’s no quick fix, even if it seems to work for someone on #guttok. Many people suffer from gastrointestinal conditions that are best treated by consulting a medical professional. However, there are some research-driven dietary changes you can make to heal your gut over time. Let’s take a look at 6 gastroenterologist-backed methods for diversifying and improving the gut microbiome.

6 Things You Can Do For Your Gut Health

Eat fermented foods.

A clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine found that a diet high in fermented foods, such as kimchi, kefir, and cottage cheese, continually increased microbiota diversity and decreased inflammatory markers over a period of 17 weeks. Fermented foods are rich in good bacteria; read our blog about other types of fermented food and fermentation here

Eat more fiber.

The same Stanford trial also examined the role of fiber in diet and found that it increased microbiome function, especially coupled with the consumption of fermented foods. Consuming soluble and insoluble fiber also promotes regularity and digestive function. Learn more about high-fiber foods and the role of fiber on our blog here

Reduce consumption of processed foods.

Research has found that regular consumption of processed and ultra-processed foods (like sugary soda, chips, artificial cheese, fried chicken, fast food) reduces gut diversity while increasing symptoms of gut disorders like IBS, the risk of depression, inflammation, and mortality. Unfortunately, many readily-accessible foods with a long-shelf life are highly-processed, even ones that appear “healthy,” so taking time to research nutritional information is key.

Reduce consumption of spicy foods. 

Spicy food isn’t “dangerous,” but consuming it often can irritate the stomach and increase symptoms of certain gut disorders, like IBS, IBD, and acid reflux. 

Don’t smoke.

Smoking and the toxic chemicals in cigarette smokes harms every part of the digestive system; from increasing the risk of heartburn and peptic ulcers to harming intestinal microflora, increasing inflammation, and increasing oxidative stress. 

Take probiotics.

Probiotic supplements and probiotic-rich foods contain life bacteria that contribute to improving gut microbiome diversity. Taking probiotics may be beneficial to your health, but it’s recommended that you consult a doctor first.  

The experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you if you are concerned about your gut health or have other gastroenterological issues. For more information or to schedule an appointment at one of our Kentucky or Southern Indiana offices, contact one of our practice locations near you.  

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month: Information and Resources

April is annually designated as #IBSAwarenessMonth, a monthlong effort to focus attention on Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the millions of people it affects all over the world. Around 15% of the population suffers from IBS, but many go undiagnosed, dealing with painful, frustrating, and often stigmatized symptoms. Keep reading to learn more about the condition as well as some valuable resources.

What is IBS?

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) describes a collection of chronic symptoms occurring in the large intestine (colon). It is characterized by bloating, abdominal cramping, and a change in bowel habits. Constipation and/or diarrhea are a part of IBS. No one knows what causes the condition, although it’s more common in women than men.

Symptoms of IBS

  • Uncomfortable bloating or distention 
  • Pain or cramping in the abdominal area
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Mucus in the stool
  • Flatulence
  • Nausea or vomiting

Managing Symptoms of IBS

There’s no “cure” for IBS. Treating the condition requires symptom management: making certain lifestyle and dietary changes based on your specific needs. Here are some ways that IBS can be controlled:

  • Limiting foods that trigger IBS symptoms. These may include alcohol, chocolate, carbonated beverages, certain fruits and vegetables, or milk. 
  • Stress management. IBS can worsen during periods of high-stress or anxiety. In fact, during the pandemic, many report that their symptoms of IBS have considerably worsened. Planning ahead, making lists, meditating, taking time to relax and avoiding stressful situations can prevent aggravation of symptoms.
  • Eat more fiber. Getting plenty of fiber in your diet can promote regularity and limit symptoms of IBS. 
  • Certain medications, such as anti-diarrheal medications and anticholinergic medications. 

Life With IBS: Resources and Information

IBS affects many people’s quality of life in subtle but debilitating ways. It can affect your work, travel, relationships, and how you live out each day. In fact, on average, individuals with IBS restrict their activities 73 days out of the year. 

If you or a loved one is living with IBS, there are a variety of resources and methodologies available to help you handle daily symptoms that you may have not encountered before. 

One such method is known as “belly breathing.” By utilizing the abdomen to expand and contract breath rather than the chest, you can limit symptoms of IBS and other gastroenterological conditions. Belly breathing activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which tells the brain to move back to “rest” mode rather than “fight or flight.” It also improves stomach accommodation and pressure. 

If you frequently travel or commute to work, it can be helpful to create an IBS “survival kit”  to be of need in unfamiliar settings. This can include a change of clothes, extra bath tissue, medication, something that calms you, and anything else that may be of use.

If you are close with or live with someone with IBS, providing them a supportive and understanding relationship can be hugely beneficial. Read this helpful blog about relationships and IBS by the International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) to learn more.

Being communicative with your physician is also an important part of managing symptoms of IBS. On average, people wait with their symptoms for over 6 years before seeking help. If you think you may be experiencing IBS, seek medical advice. The IFFGD has compiled a list of “words to know” so you can better-communicate your symptoms. 

Why Does IBS Awareness Month Matter?

By participating in #IBSAwarenessMonth, you can help spread awareness, reduce stigma, and promote greater investment in IBS research. 

Visit the IFFGD’s #IBSAwarenessMonth homebase for more pertinent information and media resources toolkits. Read personal stories of people who experience IBS here. Visit the American College of Gastroenterology’s helpful resource page here.

The experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you if you are concerned about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and/or other gastroenterological medical conditions. For more information or to schedule an appointment at one of our Kentucky or Southern Indiana offices, contact one of our practice locations near you.  

 

7 Common Signs of a Duodenal Ulcer

Duodenal ulcers are a type of sore that develop in your small intestine in an area called the duodenum. This area is located at the top portion of your small intestine just past the stomach. 

This type of ulcer can be caused by several different things. Some people get duodenal ulcers from infections with Helicobacter pylori often referred to as H. pylori, a bacterium often detected in the stomach. 

Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medications which can impact the mucous barrier in the duodenum enabling acids to cause ulcers. There are also certain medical conditions that can cause duodenal ulcers. For example, duodenal ulcers can be caused by the increase in stomach acid associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. 

Additionally certain lifestyle factors can increase a person’s risk of developing duodenal ulcers including heavy drinking, smoking and heavy stress.

Research suggests that upwards of one out of 10 people in the U.S. experience a duodenal ulcer at some point in time. While ulcers were originally more common in men, the rates of ulcers in women have increased in recent years.

Though duodenal ulcers may be confused with other medical conditions, there are some common signs and symptoms. Follow along for 7 common signs of a duodenal ulcer.

7 Signs of a Duodenal Ulcer

1. Stomach pain which sometimes becomes more severe and then gets better depending on what you are eating and drinking.

2. Bloating and an overall feeling of fullness especially after you eat 

3. Increased gas and a need to burp

4. Nausea and even feeling like you might need to vomit

5. Weight loss which can happen if the ulcer causes any type of blockage in your digestive track which makes it difficult for food to travel through your stomach.

6. Weight gain through comfort eating in order to find pain relief through food that neutralizes the acid build up. 

7. Indigestion, sometimes called dyspepsia, which is characterized by discomfort and a burning feeling in your upper abdomen area.

8. Extremely serious ulcer cases can cause more severe symptoms and complications that require immediate medical attention including blood in your stool. 

If you think that you might be suffering from a duodenal ulcer, you should seek out experienced medical attention. When left untreated, duodenal ulcers can lead to more serious complications including bleeding and even perforations in your intestine. There are certain tests that your gastroenterologist may perform for diagnostic purposes. An endoscopy is often used to diagnose a duodenal ulcer. Through this test your physician is uses a flexible telescope which provides visibility in the duodenum so that ulcers can be detected. Your doctor may also test you to see if you have H. pylori.

The experienced team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here for you if you are concerned about duodenal ulcers and other gastroenterological medical conditions. For more information or to schedule an appointment at one of our Kentucky or Southern Indiana offices, contact one of our practice locations near you.  

An Overview of Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, an important time to spread awareness and learn more about the risks associated with colorectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. In the United States this year, an estimated 151,030 adults will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and ​​an estimated 52,580 will die from the disease. 

Despite its significant rate of incidence, colorectal cancer is highly preventable through the use of screening tests. Gastroenterology Health Partners, in conjunction with the American Cancer Society and Digestive Health Partners Association, recommends that those with an average risk start screenings at age 45. 

Of the colorectal cancer screening tests that we offer, colonoscopy remains the gold-standard of effectiveness and is strongly suggested for anyone eligible. Observational studies have suggested that colonoscopy can reduce colorectal cancer occurrence by 40% and mortality rates by 60%. 

If you’re considering scheduling a screening test, talk to an experienced gastroenterologist. They can help you make the right decision for your needs. 

Keep reading to learn about six commonly-offered colorectal cancer screening tests.

6 Common Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests

1. Colonoscopy

As mentioned above, the colonoscopy is the best diagnostic tool available. This out-patient procedure involves the use of a thin, flexible tube with a camera to exam the lining of the colon (large intestine) for abnormalities such as polyps. Some polyps can be removed with a scope during the procedure. Your doctor may also take tissue samples for analysis as well.

While the colonoscopy does require prep and recovery time, it is a fast, virtually risk-free procedure. Afterwards, your doctor will discuss your results with you and recommend whether you should be screened in 1, 5, or 10 years. To learn more about the colonoscopy, how it works, how to prepare, and more, read here

2. Fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

Often considered the second choice after a colonoscopy, the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) offers a non-invasive method for identifying colorectal cancer. The test, often performed at home, tests for hidden (occult) blood in the stool. This unnoticeable blood is often an early-sign of colorectal cancer. 

If you test positive for hidden blood during a FIT test, your doctor will want to perform another test, most likely a colonoscopy. FIT, unlike colonoscopy, is unable to actually identify or remove polyps and abnormal tissue. Therefore, the FIT is not really a viable “preventative” test and has a much lower accuracy rate. 

3. CT Colonography

The CT Colonography is also known as a “virtual colonoscopy.” This test uses a CT scan (a form of x-ray technology) to exam the colon for polyps. A small scope is inserted slightly into the colon to inflate it with air. Then, pictures are taken of the entire colon. The CT Colonography is highly effective, and, unlike a colonoscopy, it doesn’t require sedation. However, unlike a colonoscopy, this exam doesn’t actually remove precancerous polyps, it only can identify them.

4. Cologuard

Cologuard is another non-invasive, at-home colon screening test. Much like the FIT test, it looks at stool DNA samples. While Cologuard is generally more effective than FIT, it still doesn’t compare to the effectiveness of the colonoscopy–while colonoscopy is known to identify over 70% of precancerous polyps, Cologuard only identifies around 42%.

5. Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a comparable procedure to the colonoscopy. It is an exam of the lower part of the colon using a small, flexible, lighted tube. The tube, called a flexible sigmoidoscope, has a camera which allows the doctor to view the inside of the rectum and the sigmoid colon—about the last two feet of the large intestine. Unlike a colonoscopy, this procedure does not allow the doctor to see the entire colon; any cancers or polyps far in the colon cannot be detected. 

6. Capsule Endoscopy

A capsule endoscopy is a procedure that examines the lining of the middle part of the small intestine, the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. This procedure is necessary because a standard endoscope or colonoscope cannot reach this part of the bowel. Capsule endoscopy is often used to search for causes of bleeding as well as detect polyps, tumors, ulcers, and IBD.

During this procedure, the patient will swallow a tiny pill containing a video camera, light source, and battery. The camera will take 2-3 pictures per second for up to 12 hours, traveling through the GI tract. The photos are saved automatically to a recording device and strung into a video. 

While capsule endoscopy is effective for detecting and documenting significant lesions attributed to conditions such as IBD, tumors, and ulcers, it is significantly less effective as a colon screening test compared to colonoscopy. 

 When it comes to colon cancer screenings, the experienced medical team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here to serve you. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment at one of our offices in Southern Indiana or Kentucky, contact a Gastroenterology Health Partners location near you.

Can Weight Loss Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer?

Obesity is an epidemic in the United States. In 2018, 42.4% of American adults were found to be obese, an increase of over 12% since 2000. In 2020, 36.6% of adults in Kentucky and 36.8% of adults in Indiana were found to be obese.

Obesity is associated with an increased mortality rate as well as a variety of negative health conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and certain types of cancer. Obesity can impact your quality of life, harming mental health as well as physical. What’s more, obesity costs the American public over $150 billion in medical bills each year. 

How is Obesity Calculated? An Overview of BMI

Obesity is determined by BMI, or “body mass index,” a measurement of weight status based on height and weight. For adults, a BMI of less than 18.5 is underweight, a BMI of 18.5 – 24.9 is healthy weight, a BMI of 25.0 – 29.9 is overweight, and 30.0 and above is obese. You can measure your BMI using this online calculator created by the CDC. 

Being obese, or having a BMI of 30.0 and above, has been considered a risk factor of developing colorectal cancer for years. However, few studies to date have examined the effects of weight change, such as significant weight loss or gain, on the risk of developing cancer. 

The Latest Research on the Health Benefits of Weight Loss

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland found that weight loss may greatly reduce the risk of developing precancerous polyps (adenomas). They examined the effects of weight loss and weight gain throughout several periods of adulthood for 154,942 American adults. For those who were initially overweight and lost weight over time, the risk of developing certain types of adenomas was reduced by 46%. For those who gained weight in adulthood, the risk of developing adenomas was increased by 30%. Interestingly, these findings were generally more statistically significant in men than women. 

Why is obesity associated with higher risk of developing adenomas? One factor, as discussed by Dr. Kathryn Hughes Barry, a co-author of the study, is insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is associated with obesity. “[Insulin resistance] can increase cell growth and reduce the chance of cell death, changes that are linked with increased chances of developing cancer. Insulin resistance may also lead to type 2 diabetes, which is considered an independent risk factor for colorectal cancer.” 

In addition to reducing the risk of developing precancerous polyps, losing weight in adulthood can improve your energy levels, physical mobility, general mood, and self-confidence, according to CDC data. Even modest weight loss can result in positive health benefits, such as improved blood pressure and cholesterol levels. If you are interested in learning our tips for healthy weight loss, watch this informative video featuring Dr. Sunana Sohi of Gastroenterology Health Partners or check out the CDC’s step-by-step guide to healthy weight loss here.

In addition to maintaining a healthy weight, getting a regular colon cancer screening is another important practice in the prevention of colon cancer. When it comes to colon cancer screenings, the experienced medical team at Gastroenterology Health Partners is here to serve you. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment at one of our offices in Southern Indiana or Kentucky, contact a Gastroenterology Health Partners location near you.

 

2022 Bottoms Up Bash

Gastro Health Partners is proud to sponsor the 11th Annual Bottoms Up Bash! This exceptional event, put on by the Colon Cancer Prevention Project, is a celebration of progress in the fight against colon cancer and an opportunity to raise crucial funds for ending preventable colon cancer death and suffering in Southern Indiana and Kentucky.

What is the Colon Cancer Prevention Project?

Here’s some more information about the CCPP’s mission and work:

“The Colon Cancer Prevention Project founded in 2003 by Dr. Whitney Jones, a Louisville gastroenterologist with a passion for preventing colon cancer. Dr. Jones began the organization after diagnosing several patients with colon cancer within one week. Sick and tired of diagnosing patients with cancer that could have been prevented, he set out to make a change.

The Project began as a small grassroots organization with a large mission of eliminating preventable colon cancer death and suffering. It quickly grew to include work across Kentucky, Indiana, and the country. Before the Project, only 1 in 3 Kentuckians were getting life-saving colon cancer screenings. Now, about 2 in 3 Kentuckians are getting screened, and the incidence rate is down more than 25 percent. Kentucky is now nationally renowned for its work, which includes a state-wide screening program for low-income, uninsured people.

We are committed to educating our communities younger about the power they have to prevent colon cancer. The United States Preventative Services Task Force now recommends average-risk people begin screening at age 45 and those with a family history should screen at 40 or younger. With the help of partners across the state and WKYT, the Project is launching first-of-its-kind digital outreach campaigns to educate & empower our communities to get screened by reaching them on their phones and devices.

We continue to work to make screening more accessible to those who are uninsured and underinsured in our community by promoting free screening resources available through Kentucky Cancer LinkKentucky Cancer Program, and the Kentucky Colon Cancer Screening and Prevention Program.

The Bash is Back!

The 2022 Bottoms Up Bash will feature dinner, drinks, dancing, live music by the Crashers, and a silent auction. The event is on March 4, or Dress in Blue Day, and guests are encouraged to dress in their brightest blue to help kick off Colon Cancer Awareness Month. (Note: Event is ages 21+).

“All funds raised will go towards ending colon cancer death and suffering in Kentucky and Southern Indiana. We can’t wait to see you there!” 

Learn more about this great event and buy tickets here: https://coloncancerpreventionproject.org/events/bottoms-up-bash-2021/

2022 Bottoms Up Bash is Sponsored by GHP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gastroenterology Health Partners (GHP) is the largest independent Gastroenterology practice in the region providing care to children, teenagers, and adults across Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky, Southern Indiana, and surrounding communities. GHP has officially endorsed the Digestive Health Partners Association’s message that men and women between the ages of 45 and 75 should be screened for colorectal cancer. This endorsement is backed by the American Cancer Society which also recommends that individuals at average-risk of contracting colorectal cancer begin screenings at the age of 45. 

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience performing colonoscopies and other colorectal cancer screenings. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.