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What is Infusion Therapy?

When people become severely sick or weighed down by compound disease conditions, oftentimes they have difficulty swallowing. This can make seemingly simple things like eating, drinking and taking medications difficult.

Additionally, certain medications may not be recommended orally since an individual’s stomach acids may affect their quality, rendering them ineffective when it comes to treating diseases.

There are many reasons why people may receive medication through their body instead of their mouth (orally).

What is Infusion Therapy?

Infusion therapy is an alternative to oral treatment that entails the administration of drugs or medicine through a sterile catheter or needle. These are often introduced into a patient’s vein and secured by a professional healthcare provider. This treatment option has been used for a long time by hospitals.

Increasingly, infusion therapy is also applied in outpatient healthcare settings and community care centers, by specialized nurses who are professionally trained to carry out this procedure. At Gastroenterology Health Partners, our outpatient infusion center is available to patients in a convenient and higher quality setting, with no wait time and ample appointment availability. Depending on one’s insurance carrier and plan, this procedure can often be done at a lower cost, with the benefit of getting to know the same infusion RN over time.

What Medical Conditions Does Infusion Therapy Treat?

Infusion therapy is primarily used to treat severe or chronic diseases and infections that may not respond to oral antibiotics. There are many examples of disease conditions and infections that are treated continuously using infusion therapy. This includes different types of cancers, gastrointestinal tract infections, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

An Overview of What to Expect with Outpatient Infusion Treatment

There are a couple of factors that you need to expect with outpatient infusion treatment or therapy.

The infusion process typically lasts for an hour, but this does vary. The time taken during this therapy is based on the type of medication administered and also the kind of illness or infection being treated. While some medicines require more extended periods of infusion, others take a short time.

Dosage also dictates the length of infusion. In some cases, patients receive their infusion dosage slowly, especially for their first time. Whereas for others, it may take a longer length of time. This may be done to confirm that a patient doesn’t develop adverse reactions to the medication offered via infusion.

Prior to the administration of infusion therapy, there is also some preparation. This might involve recording a patient’s blood pressure, weight, height, and body temperature.

Prior to infusion therapy your doctor might ask you to prepare by drinking a specific amount of water. You may also be advised to wear comfortable clothing for the procedure.

As an infusion patient, you have a choice in deciding a location for your infusion therapy. Cost and convenience are critical to this decision.  GHP offers the convenience of this service to its patients at a cost which is far lower than an inpatient setting. Contact any of our office locations to reach a dedicated infusion therapy concierge to confirm options available to you based on your specific health plan.

Understanding IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of the digestive tract that results in chronic inflammation. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two most common forms of IBD. Ulcerative colitis specifically affects the colon and rectum while Crohn’s disease inflames all areas of the gastrointestinal tract. While a direct cause is not known, inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be a result of an abnormal immune response that causes the immune system to attack the digestive track.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Diarrhea
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Blood in stool
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Abdominal pain and cramping
  • Lack of childhood development

While one’s stress and diet may not be directly causing inflammation, lifestyle changes can help to relieve symptoms. Avoid dairy products and other problematic foods to see how they affect your flare-ups. Additionally, while fiber is known to help with bowel issues, it could behaving an adverse effect. Drink plenty of water and experiment with more frequent smaller meals.

Risk Factors

  • Age: Most patients are diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease before the age of 30.
  • Race & Ethnicity: Caucasians and those of Ashkenazi Jewish decent are at the most risk for inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Family History: Those with a first-degree relative who have suffered from IBD are more likely to develop it themselves.
  • Cigarette Smoking: IBD is most common among smokers.
  • Medications: Anti-inflammatory medicines such as ibuprofen, Advil and Aleve have been known to aggravate IBD.
  • Environment: The disease tends to affect those who live in more urbanized and developed areas as well as northern climates.

Patients who are experiencing signs of IBD or know that they are at an increased risk for developing it should take preventive measures by routinely checking in with a healthcare professional. Having IBD increases your risk for colon cancer and blood clots.

Although there is no cure for inflammatory bowel disease, medication is an effective treatment option for those with ulcerative colitis. However, 70% of those with Crohn’s disease often require surgery in order to relieve their symptoms.

If you or a loved one feels they could have ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, schedule an appointment with one of our fellowship-trained gastroenterologist today.

Common Causes of Constipation

Constipation is often defined by tough, hard to pass bowel movements that occur infrequently. Other signs and symptoms include bloating, having the sensation of an incomplete evacuation, abdominal pain and blood present in the stool.

While constipation is known for being both physically uncomfortable and embarrassing, the condition is more common than one might think. Constipation affects approximately 30 percent of the general population, and is most prevalent in women, children and the elderly. Persistent constipation should not be ignored as it could be the sign of a more serious condition, such as colon cancer or Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

What are some of the Common Causes of Constipation ?

Dehydration

“If you don’t have enough water in your body already, the large intestine soaks up water from your food waste,” making for harder to pass stools. Caffeine can cause dehydration, and even dairy has been known to constipate some people. Proper hydration however, can help move food through the intestines and create softer stools.

Lack of Fiber

Fiber encourages regular bowel movements by allowing more water to remain in your stool and hastening it’s passage through the gut. Foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and nuts are the best natural source of fiber. However, fiber supplements can be helpful as well.

Stress

Just like most of your bodily functions, the nervous system is in constant communication with your digestive system. During periods of intense stress, the digestive system can slow down resulting in constipation. Waiting too long to go to the bathroom for example, can cause a build up.

Not Enough Physical Activity 

Regular activity helps to stimulate the muscles in intestines and can also help alleviate stress.

Medication

Though laxatives can help ease constipation, they can also become habit forming meaning that one’s bowel movements end up depending on them. Overusing laxatives can over time can weaken the bowel muscles. Additionally, many anti-depressants and pain medications are common causes of constipation. It is recommended that any and all medications should be discussed with your doctor.

While many lifestyle changes can help to relieve constipation, if you experience chronic constipation, schedule an appointment with one of our fellowship-trained gastroenterologist today.

 

Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” Walk Great Success!

Gastroenterology Health Partners’ first Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” walk on Saturday, June 1st, 2019 was a great success and a lot of fun, as well!

Gastroenterology Health Partners sponsored the walk, alongside Takeda and University of Kentucky Healthcare. GHP also participated as a team under the name “Strollin’ for the Colon.” As a team, Gastroenterology Health Partners raised $693.00 for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis.

The walk team, “Strollin’ for the Colon”, included employees from Gastroenterology Health Partners:

  • Susan Becht
  • Kayla Kilburn
  • Shetwana Martin
  • Melissa Rainer
  • Deb Walker
  • Laura Yates
  • Rhonda Dase
  • Suzanne Mauck
  • Laura Sprinkle

The last three Gastroenterology Health Partners’ employees each raised over $100.00 for the cause.

The “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk” is a nation-wide walking event that is put on by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to give support and offer resources to those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

The $693.00 raised by Gastroenterology Health Partners, plus additional funds raised by other participating teams, will go to helping fund patient services, education, advocacy, and research to improve the quality of life for those with IBD.

 

 

Crohn’s & Colitis Take Steps Walk

Join us Saturday, June 1st at the Louisville Slugger Field for the Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk!

Registration starts at 10am and the take steps walk will begin at 11am. This event is put on by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, an organization whose mission it is to provide support and resources for those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

The nationwide walk will help fund patient services, education, advocacy and research. Through better treatment methods and cures, we can ultimately improve the quality of life for those affected by IBD.

What is Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

IBD is a term used to describe disorders involving chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are two of the most common types of IBD. Crohn’s Disease affects the lining of the entire digestive tract. However, Ulcerative Colitis specifically inflames only the lining of the colon and rectum.

While the causes for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are currently unknown, combined they affect nearly 3.1 million Americans. Patients tend to be diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35. The fast growing segment of patients are children under the age of 18. 

How to Get Involved:

The Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk is a great opportunity for patients, families, healthcare providers and organizations to come together as a community and offer lasting support to one another. For those interested in registering as a walker, donating, volunteering or creating a team of walkers, visit crohnscolitisfoundation.org for more information. Each team and individual is able to set their own fundraising goal. The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s goal for this event is $65,000.

The Gastroenterology Health Partners proudly sponsors this event. To schedule an appointment and get screened, contact us today! Additionally, the GHP clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system.  If you believe you may be a candidate for one of our studies, please contact our Research Manager, Deborah Walker via email at dwalker@ghpartners.net or by phone at 812-206-1702.

take steps walk