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Coronavirus Vaccines: Best Practices for People with IBD

People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis, may have questions about how they should approach coronavirus vaccines. The International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IOIBD) recently highlighted an article titled ‘SARS-CoV-2 vaccination for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: recommendations from an international consensus meeting.’ In this article, the organization highlights the recommendations related to coronavirus vaccines IOIBD has developed for people with IBD. Here are a few highlights:

1. People with IBD should get a coronavirus vaccine

Overall, there was broad and overwhelming agreement among IOIBD members that coronavirus vaccines are safe and necessary for people with IBD. This consensus was reached through multiple questions that explored IOIBD member opinions on the efficacy and safety of the vaccines for IBD patients.

2. People with IBD should get a coronavirus vaccine as soon as it is possible

Not only does the IOIBD recommend vaccines for people with IBD, they recommend people with IBD receive a vaccination as soon as they are eligible.

3. Coronavirus vaccines, including messenger RNA vaccines, replication-incompetent vector vaccines, inactivated vaccines and recombinant vaccines, are safe for people with IBD

IOIBD members considered the main types of vaccines that may be available for people with IBD. They did this to ensure safety across all vaccines. After review, they broadly agreed that all vaccine types are safe.

4. Coronavirus vaccination shouldn’t be delayed if a person with IBD is receiving immune-modifying therapies

Some people with IBD may be undergoing immune-modifying therapy to suppress an inflammatory response. Still, coronavirus vaccines are safe for them.

5. People with IBD who receive a coronavirus vaccine should be informed that the vaccine’s efficacy can decrease if they are receiving systemic corticosteroids

This is also an important insight for people with IBD. They should receive a coronavirus vaccine when possible. However, if they are receiving corticosteroids to calm a flare-up, the vaccine may be less effective.

Our experienced team at Gastro Health Partners continues to safely provide care for our patients during the coronavirus pandemic. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Visit us online at https://www.gastrohealthpartners.com/ to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Chronic Diarrhea: What You Should Know

Chronic diarrhea can be caused by a variety of things, including infections, GI disorders, food intolerance, and a reaction to medication. Let’s take a closer look at the condition.

Causes and Risk Factors

Diarrhea is chronic when it occurs three or more times per day for more than two weeks. It has several potential causes. Infection is one main cause. This infection can be parasitic, and from parasites like Giardia or Cyclospora. Infection can also be bacterial, from bacteria like Salmonella and E. coli. Some viral infections cause chronic diarrhea too, like some rhinoviruses and rotoviruses.

Outside of infections, there are several other potential causes. Pancreatic disorders like pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis can be a cause. GI diseases like Chrohn’s and IBS can cause diarrhea as well. Intolerance to foods can be at play too- lactose intolerance and fructose malabsorption are two examples. Additionally, some medications like laxatives and antibiotics can cause chronic diarrhea.

Symptoms of Chronic Diarrhea

As previously mentioned, diarrhea becomes chronic if it occurs three or more times per day for two or more weeks. Diarrhea is characterized by loose, watery stools that occur often more frequently than usual. Other symptoms include abdominal pain, abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea, blood or mucus in stool, and a fever. It also dehydrates you over time. If left untreated, this can be very dangerous. You should always see a doctor for chronic diarrhea.

Diagnosis

Chronic diarrhea itself is simple to diagnose, based on the definition outlined above. When you see a doctor for chronic diarrhea, they will work to diagnose the underlying cause. Depending on your symptoms, medical history, medications, the results of a physical exam, and other factors, they will select the appropriate testing measures. Stool samples can be tested to help identify if parasites, bacteria, or viruses are a cause. Your doctor may also want to do a blood test. If initial testing does not reveal a cause, your doctor may order an x-ray or endoscopy.

Chronic Diarrhea Treatment and Prevention

The cause of the condition dictates its treatment. With any case of diarrhea, fluid replacement is key. You should consume fluids and salts to replace those lost through diarrhea, unless otherwise ordered by your doctor. Some fruit juices and soup can be good options here. If liquids are upsetting your stomach, your doctor may recommend an IV to help rehydrate you.

Diarrhea caused by infection can often be treated with antibiotics or other medications. Your doctor will prescribe the proper medication for you depending on your case. If infection isn’t the cause, it will likely take more time to determine the underlying cause and therefore appropriate treatment. Conditions like IBS, Chrohn’s, fructose malabsorption, and Ulcerative Colitis all have their own treatment approaches. Your doctor will work with you to determine the best treatment options depending on the underlying cause.

Preventing chronic diarrhea involves mitigating risk factors for its various causes. To avoid infections that cause diarrhea, always drink safe, clean, properly-treated water. You should also use good food handling techniques, and practice good hand hygiene after using the bathroom and around food. If some foods trigger diarrhea for you, narrow down what they are and avoid them if possible.

Our experienced team at GHP has years of experience treating GI conditions like chronic diarrhea. We can help establish the best plan of care for your situation. Contact any of our office locations to learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation 2020 Take Steps Walk

Join us on Saturday, June 20th for the Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Virtual Walk

The Take Steps Walk is put on by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, an organization with a mission to provide support and resources for people suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The nationwide walk will help fund patient services, education, advocacy and research.

Gastroenterology Health Partners proudly sponsors this event. Through better treatment methods and cures, we can improve the quality of life for those affected by IBD. To schedule an appointment and get screened, contact us today.

This Year’s Virtual Walk

In light of CDC guidelines during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation will not be hosting in person walks this year. Instead, they are hosting a national TAKE STEPS + VIRTUAL walk experience on Saturday, June 20, 2020. Visit their website to read a full update on the event.

What is Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

IBD is a term that describes disorders involving chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are two of the most common types of IBD. Crohn’s Disease affects the lining of the entire digestive tract. Ulcerative Colitis specifically inflames the lining of the colon and rectum.

While the causes for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are currently unknown, combined they affect nearly 3.1 million Americans. Patients tend to get diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35. However, the fastest growing segment of patients is children under the age of 18.

IBD and COVID-19

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation has compiled helpful information and resources on the topic of COVID-19 and IBD on their website. This includes video interviews with medical professionals, helpful tips, and other resources. Visit their website to learn more.

Join and Support the Walk

The Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk is a great opportunity for patients, families, healthcare providers and organizations to come together as a community and offer lasting support to one another. For those interested in registering as a virtual walker, donating, or creating a team of virtual walkers, visit the Virtual Walk FAQ page for more information. Each team and individual is able to set their own fundraising goal. Visit the Kentucky Take Steps page or the Indiana Take Steps page to learn more, register, and make a donation!

5 Things to Know About Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation in the digestive tract. When someone has UC, ulcers form where inflammation has injured cells lining the colon and these ulcers eventually may bleed and create pus. This can lead to the colon needing to be emptied frequently. 

While there is no cure, healthcare professionals can help patients with Ulcerative Colitis pursue proven treatment options for managing their symptoms, and researchers continue to study the disease. Here are 5 things to know about Ulcerative Colitis. 

Causes and Risk Factors

Medical understanding of the cause of Ulcerative Colitis is limited. There are two primary causes of UC that researchers are working to understand. 

First, it could be related to your immune system. A virus or bacterium might trigger UC because of inflammation from an immune response. Some developing research may support this theory. In a recent study, Stanford researchers found that a group of patients with Ulcerative Colitis had a depleted amount of a specific family of bacteria that produces anti-inflammatory substances. 

A second possible cause of Ulcerative Colitis is related to hereditary factors. There is evidence that UC is more common in people with family histories of the disease, so family history is considered a risk factor. However, most people with the disease do not have a family history, so it is not considered a proven cause of UC. 

Types

There are several types of Ulcerative Colitis, each of which is classified by location in the digestive tract. Ulcerative Proctitis is a classification for UC where inflammation is confined to the rectum. Proctosigmoiditis is a type where inflammation occurs in the rectum and lower end of the colon. Left-sided Colitis is when inflammation extends further into the descending colon. Pancolitis is a classification for inflammation that goes beyond just the descending colon and often affects the entire colon. Lastly, Fulminant Colitis is an acute life-threatening form of UC that affects the entire colon.

Symptoms 

Symptoms of Ulcerative Colitis can vary by type and degree of the disease. Loose and urgent bowel movements, bloody stool, abdominal pain and cramps, and persistent diarrhea are common symptoms. Outside of the intestine, symptoms may include fever, nausea, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Often times, symptoms will not be constant. Flare-ups are a common occurrence for people with UC, as are remission periods without symptoms.

Diagnosis

Patients are advised to see a medical professional if they are experiencing persistent changes in their bowel habits or other Ulcerative Colitis symptoms. When a patient is tested for UC, there are several possible approaches. Blood tests, barium enemas, CT scans, colonoscopies, and flexible sigmoidoscopies can all be used to diagnose UC. 

Treatment

Treatment for UC is focused on managing symptoms, as there is no known cure. A combination of medications and lifestyle changes is often helpful, including anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, corticosteriods, avoiding gassy foods, managing stress, and staying hydrated. If these measures do not relieve symptoms, surgery may be recommended by a doctor. Surgery typically means removing the entire colon and rectum. 

Ulcerative Colitis can often be effectively managed with professional guidance and care. GHP is dedicated to helping patients with UC manage their symptoms and live healthy, happy, and full lives. Contact any of our office locations learn about the options we offer and schedule an appointment today.

What is Infusion Therapy?

When people become severely sick or weighed down by compound disease conditions, oftentimes they have difficulty swallowing. This can make seemingly simple things like eating, drinking and taking medications difficult.

Additionally, certain medications may not be recommended orally since an individual’s stomach acids may affect their quality, rendering them ineffective when it comes to treating diseases.

There are many reasons why people may receive medication through their body instead of their mouth (orally).

What is Infusion Therapy?

Infusion therapy is an alternative to oral treatment that entails the administration of drugs or medicine through a sterile catheter or needle. These are often introduced into a patient’s vein and secured by a professional healthcare provider. This treatment option has been used for a long time by hospitals.

Increasingly, infusion therapy is also applied in outpatient healthcare settings and community care centers, by specialized nurses who are professionally trained to carry out this procedure. At Gastroenterology Health Partners, our outpatient infusion center is available to patients in a convenient and higher quality setting, with no wait time and ample appointment availability. Depending on one’s insurance carrier and plan, this procedure can often be done at a lower cost, with the benefit of getting to know the same infusion RN over time.

What Medical Conditions Does Infusion Therapy Treat?

Infusion therapy is primarily used to treat severe or chronic diseases and infections that may not respond to oral antibiotics. There are many examples of disease conditions and infections that are treated continuously using infusion therapy. This includes different types of cancers, gastrointestinal tract infections, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

An Overview of What to Expect with Outpatient Infusion Treatment

There are a couple of factors that you need to expect with outpatient infusion treatment or therapy.

The infusion process typically lasts for an hour, but this does vary. The time taken during this therapy is based on the type of medication administered and also the kind of illness or infection being treated. While some medicines require more extended periods of infusion, others take a short time.

Dosage also dictates the length of infusion. In some cases, patients receive their infusion dosage slowly, especially for their first time. Whereas for others, it may take a longer length of time. This may be done to confirm that a patient doesn’t develop adverse reactions to the medication offered via infusion.

Prior to the administration of infusion therapy, there is also some preparation. This might involve recording a patient’s blood pressure, weight, height, and body temperature.

Prior to infusion therapy your doctor might ask you to prepare by drinking a specific amount of water. You may also be advised to wear comfortable clothing for the procedure.

As an infusion patient, you have a choice in deciding a location for your infusion therapy. Cost and convenience are critical to this decision.  GHP offers the convenience of this service to its patients at a cost which is far lower than an inpatient setting. Contact any of our office locations to reach a dedicated infusion therapy concierge to confirm options available to you based on your specific health plan.

Understanding IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of the digestive tract that results in chronic inflammation. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two most common forms of IBD. Ulcerative colitis specifically affects the colon and rectum while Crohn’s disease inflames all areas of the gastrointestinal tract. While a direct cause is not known, inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be a result of an abnormal immune response that causes the immune system to attack the digestive track.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Diarrhea
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Blood in stool
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Abdominal pain and cramping
  • Lack of childhood development

While one’s stress and diet may not be directly causing inflammation, lifestyle changes can help to relieve symptoms. Avoid dairy products and other problematic foods to see how they affect your flare-ups. Additionally, while fiber is known to help with bowel issues, it could behaving an adverse effect. Drink plenty of water and experiment with more frequent smaller meals.

Risk Factors

  • Age: Most patients are diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease before the age of 30.
  • Race & Ethnicity: Caucasians and those of Ashkenazi Jewish decent are at the most risk for inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Family History: Those with a first-degree relative who have suffered from IBD are more likely to develop it themselves.
  • Cigarette Smoking: IBD is most common among smokers.
  • Medications: Anti-inflammatory medicines such as ibuprofen, Advil and Aleve have been known to aggravate IBD.
  • Environment: The disease tends to affect those who live in more urbanized and developed areas as well as northern climates.

Patients who are experiencing signs of IBD or know that they are at an increased risk for developing it should take preventive measures by routinely checking in with a healthcare professional. Having IBD increases your risk for colon cancer and blood clots.

Although there is no cure for inflammatory bowel disease, medication is an effective treatment option for those with ulcerative colitis. However, 70% of those with Crohn’s disease often require surgery in order to relieve their symptoms.

If you or a loved one feels they could have ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, schedule an appointment with one of our fellowship-trained gastroenterologist today.

Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” Walk Great Success!

Gastroenterology Health Partners’ first Louisville “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps” walk on Saturday, June 1st, 2019 was a great success and a lot of fun, as well!

Gastroenterology Health Partners sponsored the walk, alongside Takeda and University of Kentucky Healthcare. GHP also participated as a team under the name “Strollin’ for the Colon.” As a team, Gastroenterology Health Partners raised $693.00 for Crohn’s Disease and Colitis.

The walk team, “Strollin’ for the Colon”, included employees from Gastroenterology Health Partners:

  • Susan Becht
  • Kayla Kilburn
  • Shetwana Martin
  • Melissa Rainer
  • Deb Walker
  • Laura Yates
  • Rhonda Dase
  • Suzanne Mauck
  • Laura Sprinkle

The last three Gastroenterology Health Partners’ employees each raised over $100.00 for the cause.

The “Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk” is a nation-wide walking event that is put on by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to give support and offer resources to those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

The $693.00 raised by Gastroenterology Health Partners, plus additional funds raised by other participating teams, will go to helping fund patient services, education, advocacy, and research to improve the quality of life for those with IBD.

 

 

Crohn’s & Colitis Take Steps Walk

Join us Saturday, June 1st at the Louisville Slugger Field for the Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk!

Registration starts at 10am and the take steps walk will begin at 11am. This event is put on by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, an organization whose mission it is to provide support and resources for those suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

The nationwide walk will help fund patient services, education, advocacy and research. Through better treatment methods and cures, we can ultimately improve the quality of life for those affected by IBD.

What is Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?

IBD is a term used to describe disorders involving chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are two of the most common types of IBD. Crohn’s Disease affects the lining of the entire digestive tract. However, Ulcerative Colitis specifically inflames only the lining of the colon and rectum.

While the causes for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are currently unknown, combined they affect nearly 3.1 million Americans. Patients tend to be diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35. The fast growing segment of patients are children under the age of 18. 

How to Get Involved:

The Crohn’s and Colitis Take Steps Walk is a great opportunity for patients, families, healthcare providers and organizations to come together as a community and offer lasting support to one another. For those interested in registering as a walker, donating, volunteering or creating a team of walkers, visit crohnscolitisfoundation.org for more information. Each team and individual is able to set their own fundraising goal. The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s goal for this event is $65,000.

The Gastroenterology Health Partners proudly sponsors this event. To schedule an appointment and get screened, contact us today! Additionally, the GHP clinicians have a passion for seeking out and refining new treatments and advanced solutions for those suffering from disorders of the digestive system.  If you believe you may be a candidate for one of our studies, please contact our Research Manager, Deborah Walker via email at dwalker@ghpartners.net or by phone at 812-206-1702.

take steps walk